Grasshopper Pie for Pi Day

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Oh my, I feel like it’s been so long since I’ve written! I jumped off for a while, and time just got away from me. Since I last wrote, I turned 33! I know it’s been almost a month, but I am a nut for my birthday and still very excited about it. As part of my birthday celebration, we met up with friends at the California Clipper, one of our favorite bars. (Completely unrelated: before grabbing drinks, we had dinner at Cellar Door Provisions, and it was just such a delicious meal and wonderful experience that I feel it’s worth mentioning. If you’re in the city, go there!).

The California Clipper has lots of great cocktails, but they also have dessert cocktails, including one of my favorites: the Grasshopper! If you don’t know what a Grasshopper is, basically it’s a combination of creme de menthe (a mint-flavored liqueur), and creme de cacao (a chocolate-flavored liqueur), shaken with cream. It is a delightful guilty pleasure and, though one is my limit, I take any opportunity I can to order one, if they’re available. So, influenced by my boozy birthday dessert cocktail and fueled by the madness that is Pi Day, I present you with a pie that’s been on my list for a while: Grasshopper Pie!

There is no clear evidence where and when Grasshopper Pie was created. What is known is that the Grasshopper cocktail came first, decades before recipes for the pie began circulating in newspapers. It’s commonly accepted that the Grasshopper Cocktail was invented by Philibert Guichet, the second owner of Tujague’s restaurant in New Orleans, while he was at a cocktail competition in New York in 1928 (however some accounts date the cocktail to at least 10 years earlier). The cocktail won second place and Guichet brought the recipe home to New Orleans. In the 1950’s, as alcohol became more readily available in grocery stores, cocktail parties began to increase in popularity and shortly after that, recipes for Grasshopper Pie begin popping up. (In the early 1900’s, there are many newspaper mentions of an actual dish from the Phillipines, which uses real grasshoppers, called Grasshopper Pie.)

The earliest mention in newspapers that I could find related to the grasshopper pie that we know today, was in 1962, describing a filling of marshmallow, creme de menthe, creme de cacao, and cream. The recipe is mentioned repeatedly in newspapers all over the country, but predominately in the Midwest, beginning in the 1960’s, being made with large marshmallows. By the mid-1970’s, I started finding recipes that called for the use of gelatin and egg whites, in place of marshmallows. In The American Century Cookbook: The Most Popular Recipes For The 20th Century, author Jean Anderson suggests that this recipe variation may have come from Knox Unflavored Gelatin and Heublein Cordials, as an attempt to jointly promote their products.

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Grasshopper Pie
From the May 22, 1961 issue of the Chicago Tribune. Makes one 9-inch pie.

Ingredients:
For crust:
15 cream-filled chocolate cookies, crushed
1/4 cup unsalted butter, melted
For filling:
24 large marshmallows
2/3 cup whole milk
2 oz creme de menthe
1 oz white creme de cacao
1 cup heavy cream, whipped (plus another 1/2 cup cream, whipped for topping, optional)

Instructions:

For crust:
Add the melted butter to the bowl of crushed cookies. Mix to fully combine and press into the bottom of a 9-inch pie pan. Refrigerate while you prepare the rest of the ingredients.

For filling:
Put the marshmallows and milk in a double-boiler and melt together. Set aside to cool.

Once cool, stir in the creme de menthe and the creme de cacao, and then the whipped cream.

Pour the mixture into the prepared cookie pie shell. Allow to cool for at least two hours.

Top with more whipped cream and additional crushed cookies, optional.

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For my first try, I made the 1960’s recipe that I found in several newspapers, which used marshmallows. I’m interested in someday making this pie without marshmallows, using the recipe that calls for eggs and gelatin. If I ever follow up on that, I’ll let you know. Side note: This recipe makes a pretty pastel green pie, thanks to the creme de menthe, but you can add some green food coloring, if you really want it to pop and also look as unnatural as possible. I mean, if you’re going to go retro, you might as well really go retro.

It’s also not lost on me that St. Patrick’s Day is in three days. I suppose there won’t be a lot of people celebrating the holiday with pie, but if you do, this should be your go-to. It’s green, it contains (minimal amounts of) booze, and it’s delicious.

And if you really want to go wild on Pi Day, here are a few of my other past favorites from the blog:
Mock Cherry Pie
Penny Nejad’s Banana Meringue Pie
Lemon Atlantic Beach Pie
Bourbon Chocolate Pecan Pie
Hoosier Sugar Cream Pie

Happy Pi Day, everyone!

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