Pennsylvania Dutch Chocolate Funny Cake

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Rarely do I post on weekends, but today I am making an exception. My schedule was all thrown off after I caught a head cold earlier this week that really knocked me out. I tend to go years without getting very sick, but I feel like I’ve had about 2 colds a month since November. My immune system is officially on my list. Anyway, when I can’t taste food, I have absolutely no desire to cook or bake. I mean, really, what’s my motivation?

Toward the end of the week, though, my head was less congested and my taste buds were finally working properly again, which gave me a little time to try the newest recipe on my list: Funny Cake Pie. And it couldn’t be a more fitting recipe April Fool’s Day! This recipe is no joke, though.

Funny cake pie, or just funny cake, is a traditional recipe in the Pennsylvania Dutch community. The recipe consists of vanilla cake batter poured into an unbaked pie shell. Chocolate sauce is poured over the top of the cake batter before baking. As the cake bakes, the chocolate pools underneath the cake, creating a pretty, dark layer between the cake and the pie crust. It’s said that the pie was called “funny” as in “unusual” because of the flip-flop of the chocolate syrup and cake.

Unlike most, this is a recipe that you will often see directly associated with the Pennsylvania Dutch community. I mistakenly thought that the term “Pennsylvania Dutch” specifically applied only to the Amish. Turns out, Pennsylvania Dutch applies to the extremely large groups of people of all religions, who immigrated from what we today know as Germany, who then settled in Pennsylvania in the 17th and 18th centuries. In this case, “Dutch” does not indicate a connection to the Netherlands, but is instead a misnomer for “Deutsch,” the German word for “German.” Pennsylvania Dutch is actually a mix of several different German dialects, as well as American English. After the second World War, the dialect was almost completely discontinued, except by traditionalist religions. For example, if you ever hear Amish or Mennonite groups conversing (which I often do because the train I take to visit my mom goes right through Indiana’s Amish country), you will still hear this dialect spoken.

While I couldn’t find any in-depth history on the origins, the recipe has been made in Pennsylvania Dutch communities for several generations and seems to have had a revival in the 1950s and 60s, with home bakers often substituting the chocolate out for things like caramel, or… orange sauce… That was such a weird period for food. I guess caramel doesn’t sound half bad.

Onto the cake! Er, pie! Cake pie!

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Funny Cake Pie

Pennsylvania Dutch Chocolate Funny Cake
Slightly altered from the recipe on the Maple Springs Farm website.

Funny Cake Pie Ingredients:
For Cake:
2 cups flour
2 tsp baking powder
1/2 tsp salt
1 1/2 cups sugar
1/2 cup vegetable oil
2 eggs
1 cup milk
1 tsp vanilla

For Chocolate Sauce:
1/4 cup, plus 2 tbsp, sugar
1/4 cup unsweetened cocoa powder
1/2 cup water, warm
1/2 tsp vanilla
1 tsp espresso powder, optional

Funny Cake Pie Instructions:

Preheat oven to 350 degrees.

For the pie crust, you either use a 9-inch store-bought pie shell, or, if you would like to make your pie shell from scratch, I like this recipe from Epicurious. (Note: their recipe is enough for two pie shells, and you will only need one.)

In a small bowl, or large measuring cup, combine sugar, cocoa powder, vanilla, and espresso powder (optional). Slowly stir in the warm water until everything is dissolved. If still warm, allow to cool.

In a small bowl, whisk together the flour, baking powder, and salt.

In a large bowl, beat together the sugar and oil with a hand mixer. The mixture will still be quite dry at this point. Add in one egg at a time, beating to completely mix before adding the second egg. Add in the milk and vanilla, and beat until everything is consistently combined.

Slowly add the flour mixture, about 1/2 cup at a time, beating with a hand mixer in between additions, only mixing until the threads of flour disappear. Continue until flour mixture is gone.

Pour the cake batter mixture into the pie crust. Then pour the chocolate sauce over the top of the cake batter.

Bake for approximately an hour, or until a toothpick inserted into the middle of the cake comes out clean.

Allow to cool slightly. Cake can be served warm or at room temperature.

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I really didn’t know what to expect. My first concern was that the cake would cook faster than the pie crust, leaving me with raw dough under the cake. That didn’t happen though. Somehow, both cake and shell cooked perfectly together. The cake was slightly dense in texture, much like a pound cake, and not overly sweet. The chocolate layer was just sweet and moist enough to balance out the carb layers sandwiching it. The best description I can give is something along the lines of chocolate-croissant-muffin? Perfection, really. It’s hard to believe that I’m only just discovering it, and that figuring out how to combine cake and pie was not, in fact, my life’s work up to this point. I’ve seen it mentioned that this cake is sometimes eaten for breakfast. So, I’m not saying you should go make it right now, but… what else are you doing?

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