The Queen’s Chocolate Perfection Pie

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It’s good to be back in the saddle again. I took a brief break from the blog to have a lovely visit to the Pacific Northwest with Alex. We had such a good time, driving all over northwestern Washington, before spending our last few days exploring Seattle. Alex had a conference to attend in Seattle, so I had a lot of time to walk around alone and remember how to eat lunch by myself. I sincerely value the art of doing things by yourself, but it’s a skill, so it was nice to get some practice in. And we still got to spend loads of time together, walking 25,000 steps a day (not an exaggeration) and seeing the city. And luckily Spring had sprung in Chicago while we were gone, and we had warm-ish weather and flowers on the trees to greet us. But here I am, back to the blog I love the most. This time, I’m making pie!

Just last week, Alex asked which famous person I would be completely awed by if I met them. Without hesitation, I answered: Queen Elizabeth II. Of course! She’s more than famous. She’s walking, talking history! That gal has lived through so much. And not only that, she’s ruled through it. 2017 marks her 65th year on the throne!

My very serious confession is that I am 100% totally crazy about the Queen. I’m sure it’s not the most popular position to take, but that’s just how I feel. Of course I understand other folks’ mixed feelings about royalty in general. They can be stodgy and out of touch, they are an expense to the British people… but the Queen. She’s a fascinating figure and I love her. I admire her stoicism, dignity, and commitment to her role. It should also be noted that I owe a big part of my interest in genealogy to royalty. When I was a kid, before we had a computer (remember that?) I used to go through our encyclopedias making family trees of the British royals. (That may be the more serious confession right there.)

Today Queen Elizabeth turns 91 years-old, although her birthday won’t officially be celebrated until June (from what I understand, it’s because the weather is generally better then). But, in honor of this incredible lady’s actual day of birth, I made Chocolate Perfection Pie. A former chef to the Queen recently disclosed that this was her favorite dessert. The pie consists of, get this, a shortbread crust, followed by layers of cinnamon custard, chocolate sauce, cinnamon whipped topping, and chocolate-cinnamon whipped topping. I’m on board. And if it’s good enough for the Queen…

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The Queen’s Chocolate Perfection Pie
Very slightly adapted from this recipe.

Ingredients:
For the crust:
1 3/4 cups all-purpose flour
1/4 cup granulated sugar
Pinch of salt
1 stick unsalted butter, chilled and cubed
1 egg yolk
1/4 – 1/2 cup heavy cream
1/2 tsp vanilla extract

For the filling and toppings:
2 eggs
1/2 tsp ground cinnamon
1/2 cup granulated sugar
1/2 tsp apple cider vinegar
1/4 tsp salt

6 oz. chopped semi-sweet chocolate
1/2 cup water
2 egg yolks

1 cup heavy cream
1/2 tsp ground cinnamon

Dark chocolate or white chocolate bar, optional

Instructions:

For the crust:
Preheat oven to 350 degrees.

Grease a pie or tart pan and set aside.

In a large bowl or food processor, combine the flour, sugar, and salt.

Add in very cold butter cubes. If using a food processor, process for about 5 seconds, until the butter is incorporated and is in small pea-sized pieces. If using a bowl, incorporate the butter into the dry ingredients, pinching between your fingers to achieve pea-sized pieces.

Add egg yolk, 1/4 cup of heavy cream, and vanilla extract. Process or mix by hand until combined. Pinch the dough in your hand. If it holds, it’s ready. If not, add more heavy cream, 1 tablespoon at a time, until the dough holds together. Do not exceed 1/2 cup of heavy cream.

Pour the crumbs into the tart or pie pan, and use your fingers to shape to the bottom and sides.

Line the interior of the crust with parchment paper, fill with dry beans or pie weights. Bake on a cookie sheet for 20-25 minutes. Remove the crust from the oven and remove the pie weights and parchment paper. Poke holes all over the bottom of the pie crust with a fork. Return to the oven and continue baking for about 5 minutes, or until the bottom of the pie crust begins to turn light brown. Remove from oven and allow to cool almost completely.

For the filling and toppings:
Make a double boiler, using a glass or metal mixing bowl over a saucepan of boiling water. Whisking constantly, combine the eggs, sugar, cinnamon, vinegar, and salt in the bowl. The mixture will begin to foam around the edges. Once this occurs, remove from the heat and continue whisking until the mixture becomes creamy and ribbons begin to form. Pour the mixture into the bottom of the crust and bake for 15-20 minutes, until the custard just sets and begins to rise. The surface should be firm to the touch, but not hard. Allow the custard to sink and cool slightly.

In a small saucepan, or in a glass bowl in the microwave, melt the semi-sweet chocolate. Add in 1/2 cup room temperature water and whisk until the water and melted chocolate are combined. Add one egg yolk, whisking in completely before adding the second yolk and whisk completely. Pour half of the mixture (about 1/2 cup) onto the custard in the pie shell. Do not discard the remaining syrup! Bake for about 5-8 minutes. Set on a cooling rack and allow to completely cool.

In a mixing bowl, combine the whipping cream and cinnamon. Beat with a whisk or hand mixer until stiff peaks form. Spread half of the mixture onto the chocolate layer.

Stir together the remaining whipped cream and chocolate syrup until fully combined. Add that layer on top of the cinnamon whipped cream layer.

Shave the dark chocolate or white chocolate bar and sprinkle the shavings over the top of the pie.

Refrigerate for at least one hour before serving.

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The love of cinnamon-flavored, and particularly cinnamon-chocolate-flavored, desserts in the Limanowski household cannot be understated. Examples of that on this blog are here and here. We were more than happy to add another cinnamon-chocolate dish to the rotation and this one, just as its name says, is perfection. It might seem like a lot of steps, but it’s actually quite easy. Give it a try and let me know what you think!

Long live the Queen!

Pennsylvania Dutch Chocolate Funny Cake

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Rarely do I post on weekends, but today I am making an exception. My schedule was all thrown off after I caught a head cold earlier this week that really knocked me out. I tend to go years without getting very sick, but I feel like I’ve had about 2 colds a month since November. My immune system is officially on my list. Anyway, when I can’t taste food, I have absolutely no desire to cook or bake. I mean, really, what’s my motivation?

Toward the end of the week, though, my head was less congested and my taste buds were finally working properly again, which gave me a little time to try the newest recipe on my list: Funny Cake Pie. And it couldn’t be a more fitting recipe April Fool’s Day! This recipe is no joke, though.

Funny cake pie, or just funny cake, is a traditional recipe in the Pennsylvania Dutch community. The recipe consists of vanilla cake batter poured into an unbaked pie shell. Chocolate sauce is poured over the top of the cake batter before baking. As the cake bakes, the chocolate pools underneath the cake, creating a pretty, dark layer between the cake and the pie crust. It’s said that the pie was called “funny” as in “unusual” because of the flip-flop of the chocolate syrup and cake.

Unlike most, this is a recipe that you will often see directly associated with the Pennsylvania Dutch community. I mistakenly thought that the term “Pennsylvania Dutch” specifically applied only to the Amish. Turns out, Pennsylvania Dutch applies to the extremely large groups of people of all religions, who immigrated from what we today know as Germany, who then settled in Pennsylvania in the 17th and 18th centuries. In this case, “Dutch” does not indicate a connection to the Netherlands, but is instead a misnomer for “Deutsch,” the German word for “German.” Pennsylvania Dutch is actually a mix of several different German dialects, as well as American English. After the second World War, the dialect was almost completely discontinued, except by traditionalist religions. For example, if you ever hear Amish or Mennonite groups conversing (which I often do because the train I take to visit my mom goes right through Indiana’s Amish country), you will still hear this dialect spoken.

While I couldn’t find any in-depth history on the origins, the recipe has been made in Pennsylvania Dutch communities for several generations and seems to have had a revival in the 1950s and 60s, with home bakers often substituting the chocolate out for things like caramel, or… orange sauce… That was such a weird period for food. I guess caramel doesn’t sound half bad.

Onto the cake! Er, pie! Cake pie!

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Funny Cake Pie

Pennsylvania Dutch Chocolate Funny Cake
Slightly altered from the recipe on the Maple Springs Farm website.

Funny Cake Pie Ingredients:
For Cake:
2 cups flour
2 tsp baking powder
1/2 tsp salt
1 1/2 cups sugar
1/2 cup vegetable oil
2 eggs
1 cup milk
1 tsp vanilla

For Chocolate Sauce:
1/4 cup, plus 2 tbsp, sugar
1/4 cup unsweetened cocoa powder
1/2 cup water, warm
1/2 tsp vanilla
1 tsp espresso powder, optional

Funny Cake Pie Instructions:

Preheat oven to 350 degrees.

For the pie crust, you either use a 9-inch store-bought pie shell, or, if you would like to make your pie shell from scratch, I like this recipe from Epicurious. (Note: their recipe is enough for two pie shells, and you will only need one.)

In a small bowl, or large measuring cup, combine sugar, cocoa powder, vanilla, and espresso powder (optional). Slowly stir in the warm water until everything is dissolved. If still warm, allow to cool.

In a small bowl, whisk together the flour, baking powder, and salt.

In a large bowl, beat together the sugar and oil with a hand mixer. The mixture will still be quite dry at this point. Add in one egg at a time, beating to completely mix before adding the second egg. Add in the milk and vanilla, and beat until everything is consistently combined.

Slowly add the flour mixture, about 1/2 cup at a time, beating with a hand mixer in between additions, only mixing until the threads of flour disappear. Continue until flour mixture is gone.

Pour the cake batter mixture into the pie crust. Then pour the chocolate sauce over the top of the cake batter.

Bake for approximately an hour, or until a toothpick inserted into the middle of the cake comes out clean.

Allow to cool slightly. Cake can be served warm or at room temperature.

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I really didn’t know what to expect. My first concern was that the cake would cook faster than the pie crust, leaving me with raw dough under the cake. That didn’t happen though. Somehow, both cake and shell cooked perfectly together. The cake was slightly dense in texture, much like a pound cake, and not overly sweet. The chocolate layer was just sweet and moist enough to balance out the carb layers sandwiching it. The best description I can give is something along the lines of chocolate-croissant-muffin? Perfection, really. It’s hard to believe that I’m only just discovering it, and that figuring out how to combine cake and pie was not, in fact, my life’s work up to this point. I’ve seen it mentioned that this cake is sometimes eaten for breakfast. So, I’m not saying you should go make it right now, but… what else are you doing?

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The Quakers and the Hoosier Sugar Cream Pie

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Happy, happy #piday, everyone!  For the first time since December, it’s snowing here in Chicago. Like, really snowing. In March. Less than a week before Spring. To remind us all where we live and that we didn’t beat the system this winter. It’s bogus. But, what an excellent day to make (and eat) pie! For this, the most special of days, I made the official pie of my home state, Indiana: The Hoosier Sugar Cream Pie.

I have mentioned that I’m from Indiana before. I haven’t lived there for over a decade now but it is, for all technical purposes, home. My family, both sides, have lived in Indiana for well over a century. My dad’s side, mostly Scottish and German, came from Pennsylvania, down through Ohio, finally settling in Indiana in the mid-1800’s. My mom’s parents were both originally from Central Indiana. My maternal grandfather’s family were Clevengers and were part of a very large group of Quakers in the area.

Originally hailing from Guilford and Randolph Counties in North Carolina, Quakers, also known as the Society of Friends, were fierce abolitionists in a southern state where slavery was a way of life for many landowners. Unable to change the laws in North Carolina, throngs of Quakers began migrating to the free states of Ohio and Indiana in the north. My particular family line settled in Randolph County, which was named after the county they left in North Carolina. And it is generally agreed that with them came a version of the sugar cream pie recipe.

The sugar cream pie falls into the category of “desperation pie.” Desperation pies could be made by cash-strapped families with low-cost ingredients that they often already had on hand. They could also be made during the winter months when fruits were less available. The sugar cream pie was traditionally favored for its simplicity (another hallmark of the Quakers), which allowed for farm wives to toss everything into the crust, stir it with a finger, and pop it into the oven to bake as they went back out to help with the farm chores. Several variations of this recipe exist, including those from the Amish and the Shakers communities. It’s likely that all three of these groups have some responsibility for the continued popularity of this old pie in Indiana. One of its more well-known purveyors, Wick’s Pies, in Randolph County, has been in business for over 60 years and makes their sugar cream pie with a recipe dating back to the 19th century. It’s not uncommon for families, especially those near Randolph County, Indiana, to have their own family version. And in 2009, the Hoosier Sugar Cream Pie became the “official pie of Indiana.”

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Hoosier Sugar Cream Pie Recipe

Crust Ingredients:
For the crust, I halved this recipe from Epicurious.

1 1/2 cups all-purpose flour
1 tbsp granulated sugar
3/4 tsp salt
1 stick of unsalted butter, plus 1 tbsp, chilled
1/4 cup (or more) ice water
3/4 tsp apple cider vinegar

Cream Pie Filling Ingredients:
Slight variation of the Hoosier Mama Pie Company’s Hoosier Sugar Cream Pie recipe.

3 tbsp all-purpose flour
1/2 cup granulated sugar
1/2 cup dark brown sugar
1/2 tsp cinnamon
1/4 tsp salt
2 cups heavy cream
1 tsp vanilla extract
Ground nutmeg, for sprinkling
Confectioners’ sugar, for dusting

Hoosier Sugar Cream Pie Instructions:

Cut butter into 1/2-inch cubes and spread out on a plate. Cover with a dishtowel and allow to set in the freezer for about 10 minutes.

In the bowl of a food processor, add the flour, sugar, and salt. Set in the freezer as you get the remaining ingredients ready.

In a measuring cup, fill to just over a 1/4 cup, then add 3 ice cubes.

Remove the food processor bowl from the freezer and pulse a few times to combine the flour, sugar, and salt.

Add the butter all at once and quickly pulse until the mixture produces smaller than pea-sized pieces. Add the water and vinegar and pulse again about 5 times to combine. Grab a bit of the dough and squeeze together. If it holds its form, it’s done. If it is still dry, add 1 tbsp of ice water at a time, pulsing about 3 times in between, until the dough begins to form large clumps.

Pour the dough out onto a work surface, gathering into a ball any little pieces of dough that escape.

Form the dough into a ball and flatten into disk. Wrap the disk in plastic; refrigerate at least 1 hour, but preferably overnight. Before rolling out the dough for your pie, allow it to soften for about 5-10 minutes at room temperature.

Roll out the dough into a circle that’s large enough to allow the edges to fall over the edge of the pan. Crimp the edges of the dough, or decorate with a fork. Place the pie crust in the freezer for 30 minutes.

Blind bake your pie crust by first heating your oven to 400 degrees. Place the frozen shell on a baking sheet. Line the inside of the inside of the pie crust with parchment paper and fill to the top with uncooked beans or pie weights. Be sure they fill to the edges, to help the pie crust keep its shape. Bake for 10 minutes, rotate 180 degrees, and bake for 10 more minutes. Remove the pie shell from the oven, and remove the parchment paper and weights from the crust.

Prick the bottom of the crust all over with a fork. Bake for 2-3 more minutes until the crust’s interior is golden. Allow to cool to room temperature before filling.

Combine the granulated sugar, brown sugar, flour, cinnamon, and salt in a large bowl. Whisk to break up any clumps and to combine ingredients. Gently stir in the heavy cream and vanilla with a wooden spoon or spatula. Do not whip the cream or the pie will not set.

Pour the filling into the baked, cooled pie shell, sprinkle with nutmeg, and bake for 20 minutes. Rotate the pie 180° and bake for about 20 more minutes, or until the edges look as though they are beginning to set and large bubbles cover the surface. (The pie will still be jiggly in the center when you remove it from the oven.)

Allow the pie to cool to room temperature, then put it in the refrigerator to chill for at least 4 hours and up to overnight, before serving. When ready, dust with confectioners’ sugar before slicing and serving.

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And that’s it, you’ll have a rich pie to satisfy the masses. Traditionally, only white sugar would have been used, so if that is all you have, you can certainly use it in place of brown sugar. Your pie will be a bit sweeter than it would if you use a mix. Brown sugar adds caramel color and flavor to the custard filling, which is really nice. Cinnamon and vanilla may have also been a little over-budget for Indiana farm wives a century ago, but both add some nice depth. And I really think the sprinkle of nutmeg on top is important. To me, that’s what makes it a real Hoosier Cream Pie. The sweetness of this pie makes it a perfect pair to a strong cup of coffee. And if you can resist eating it all, do yourself a favor and freeze a piece to eat (while frozen) the next day. You’ll thank me for that later. Sweet eating!

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Citrus Shaker Pie

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I’m somehow surprised every year when citrus season sneaks up on me. I can never wrap my head around the fact that it’s in winter, because my favorite citrus recipes seem so light and summery. Wishful thinking, I guess. In celebration of all the beautiful citrus fruit at our disposal this time of year, I made a Shaker pie, slightly altering the original recipe, which uses regular lemons. Instead, I used two of the yummiest members of the citrus family: blood oranges and Meyer lemons.

Folks today probably know the Shakers more for their simple, well-built furniture. I decided to write about the Shakers because they  were in the news recently after one of their members passed away, leaving only two (!!) Shakers in the whole world. The reasons vary:  some Shakers who were adopted into the Community  as children chose to leave as adults, others opposed the hard-work and celibate lifestyle, and finally, they just stopped accepting new members. At this point, you couldn’t become a Shaker if you wanted to. While their numbers have dwindled, the Shakers are still one of the longest-lasting Christian sects in the United States.

The first group of Shakers formed in Manchester, England. They were originally known as “Shaking Quakers” because their religion was an off-shoot of the Quaker religion, and because, during their sermons, Shakers often tremble and twitch. A short time before the American Revolutionary War, Mother (as she was called) Ann Lee led a small group of followers from England to the American colonies. As pacifists, Shakers refused to fight the British or swear an oath of allegiance (as it was against their religion), leading to jail time for some. In the years following the War, Shaker religious communities grew and spread through the United States. At their peak, as many as 6,000 members worshiped in communities across the country.

Shakers live piously and communally. Though men and women live as equals and serve equally in religious leadership, they live separately, since marriage and sex are forbidden. Members are acquired through adoption or recruitment. As an agrarian society, Shakers grow or raise most of their own food and live quite frugally, aiming to waste as little as possible.

Which leads us to this little pie, made in accordance with the Shaker lifestyle, simply and efficiently. A Shaker lemon pie is made of whole, thinly sliced lemons, allowed to sit in sugar for a day to allow the peel to break down, which are then mixed with eggs and baked. Very simple and very delicious. Shakers would probably object to me using a non-local fruit, and, OK, traditional Shaker pies are not usually electric pink in color. If you’re a traditionalist, this recipe could easily be modified to resemble a more authentic pie, by replacing fruit with two regular lemons, but don’t rule this one out just yet… Do, however, note that this is not a one-day pie. You will need to allow your citrus to macerate in the sugar for about a day, and up to a day and a half, before baking.

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Citrus Shaker Pie

Citrus Pie Filling Ingredients:
Slightly adapted from NPR, and Smitten Kitchen

1 medium blood orange, plus zest
1 Meyer lemon, plus zest
1 3/4 cups sugar
3 tbsp flour
2 tbsp butter, melted

Zest both the lemon and the blood orange, about 2 tbsp.

Cut the ends off both the Meyer lemon and blood orange, discard.

As thinly as possible, slice the entire orange and lemon, including the peel, into rings. Remove seeds as you go.

In a container with a lid, combine the zest, sugar, and citrus. Mix to coat every ring. Cover, and allow to sit for 24 hours to 36 hours, at room temperature. The fruit will break down and dissolve the sugar. You will be left with liquid and what is left of the fruit. Do not drain, or remove fruit, but do remove any seeds that made it into the mixture.

Beat 4 eggs together well. Mix with entirety of the blood orange and Meyer lemon mixture, flour, and melted butter, and pour into prepared, bottom crust of pie (see below).

Citrus Pie Crust Ingredients:
Slightly adapted from Food and Wine

1 1/2 cups flour
1 1/2 sticks unsalted butter, cold and cut into centimeter cubes
1/4 tsp salt
1/3 cup water, ice cold
1 egg, for wash

In a food processor, combine the flour, butter, and salt. Pulse together for about 5 seconds. (This can also be done by hand or with a pastry cutter, quickly incorporating the butter into the flour.) Add the ice water to the food processor and pulse for about 5 more seconds until the dough begins to come together.

Pour the contents of the food processor and pour onto a lightly floured surface. Begin gathering the dough together until it forms  into a ball. Cut the dough into two equal parts. As your working with the first half of the dough, wrap the other and place in the refrigerator.

Re-flour your surface and roll out the first half of the dough into a large circle, approximately 1/8-inch thick (the circle should have about a 13-inch diameter). Draping the dough over your rolling pan, transfer to a 9-inch pie pan, making sure you have about 1/2-inch to 1-inch overhang on the sides. Set aside.

Roll out the second half of the dough to the same size as the first; it can be slightly smaller.

Add the lemon-orange filling to the bottom pie crust.

Carefully cover with top layer of pie crust. Cut away any unnecessary dough. Sealing the top and bottom crusts together, create a decorative edge with your hands or a fork. Allow the pie to chill in the refrigerator for about 20 minutes.

After 10 minutes, remove the pie from the refrigerator and begin to preheat your oven to 425 degrees.

Beat one egg thoroughly and brush over the top crust and edges of the pie. Sprinkle with a pinch of sugar.

Slice a few holes into the top of the pie crust to allow steam to release while cooking.

If the pie crust still feels quite cold, wait a few more minutes before putting in the oven. You don’t want the crust warm, but you don’t want it so cold that it cracks while baking.

Bake for 20 minutes at 425 degrees. After 20  minutes, decrease the heat in the oven to 350 degrees and bake for another 20 to 25 minutes.

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Blood oranges are not necessarily as sweet as regular oranges but, with its light raspberry flavor, it moderates the bitterness of the Meyer lemon and creates a bright, tart, but still sweet, and very pretty, pie. Make yours soon, before citrus season disappears!