Grasshopper Pie for Pi Day

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Oh my, I feel like it’s been so long since I’ve written! I jumped off for a while, and time just got away from me. Since I last wrote, I turned 33! I know it’s been almost a month, but I am a nut for my birthday and still very excited about it. As part of my birthday celebration, we met up with friends at the California Clipper, one of our favorite bars. (Completely unrelated: before grabbing drinks, we had dinner at Cellar Door Provisions, and it was just such a delicious meal and wonderful experience that I feel it’s worth mentioning. If you’re in the city, go there!).

The California Clipper has lots of great cocktails, but they also have dessert cocktails, including one of my favorites: the Grasshopper! If you don’t know what a Grasshopper is, basically it’s a combination of creme de menthe (a mint-flavored liqueur), and creme de cacao (a chocolate-flavored liqueur), shaken with cream. It is a delightful guilty pleasure and, though one is my limit, I take any opportunity I can to order one, if they’re available. So, influenced by my boozy birthday dessert cocktail and fueled by the madness that is Pi Day, I present you with a pie that’s been on my list for a while: Grasshopper Pie!

There is no clear evidence where and when Grasshopper Pie was created. What is known is that the Grasshopper cocktail came first, decades before recipes for the pie began circulating in newspapers. It’s commonly accepted that the Grasshopper Cocktail was invented by Philibert Guichet, the second owner of Tujague’s restaurant in New Orleans, while he was at a cocktail competition in New York in 1928 (however some accounts date the cocktail to at least 10 years earlier). The cocktail won second place and Guichet brought the recipe home to New Orleans. In the 1950’s, as alcohol became more readily available in grocery stores, cocktail parties began to increase in popularity and shortly after that, recipes for Grasshopper Pie begin popping up. (In the early 1900’s, there are many newspaper mentions of an actual dish from the Phillipines, which uses real grasshoppers, called Grasshopper Pie.)

The earliest mention in newspapers that I could find related to the grasshopper pie that we know today, was in 1962, describing a filling of marshmallow, creme de menthe, creme de cacao, and cream. The recipe is mentioned repeatedly in newspapers all over the country, but predominately in the Midwest, beginning in the 1960’s, being made with large marshmallows. By the mid-1970’s, I started finding recipes that called for the use of gelatin and egg whites, in place of marshmallows. In The American Century Cookbook: The Most Popular Recipes For The 20th Century, author Jean Anderson suggests that this recipe variation may have come from Knox Unflavored Gelatin and Heublein Cordials, as an attempt to jointly promote their products.

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Grasshopper Pie
From the May 22, 1961 issue of the Chicago Tribune. Makes one 9-inch pie.

For crust:
15 cream-filled chocolate cookies, crushed
1/4 cup unsalted butter, melted
For filling:
24 large marshmallows
2/3 cup whole milk
2 oz creme de menthe
1 oz white creme de cacao
1 cup heavy cream, whipped (plus another 1/2 cup cream, whipped for topping, optional)


For crust:
Add the melted butter to the bowl of crushed cookies. Mix to fully combine and press into the bottom of a 9-inch pie pan. Refrigerate while you prepare the rest of the ingredients.

For filling:
Put the marshmallows and milk in a double-boiler and melt together. Set aside to cool.

Once cool, stir in the creme de menthe and the creme de cacao, and then the whipped cream.

Pour the mixture into the prepared cookie pie shell. Allow to cool for at least two hours.

Top with more whipped cream and additional crushed cookies, optional.

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For my first try, I made the 1960’s recipe that I found in several newspapers, which used marshmallows. I’m interested in someday making this pie without marshmallows, using the recipe that calls for eggs and gelatin. If I ever follow up on that, I’ll let you know. Side note: This recipe makes a pretty pastel green pie, thanks to the creme de menthe, but you can add some green food coloring, if you really want it to pop and also look as unnatural as possible. I mean, if you’re going to go retro, you might as well really go retro.

It’s also not lost on me that St. Patrick’s Day is in three days. I suppose there won’t be a lot of people celebrating the holiday with pie, but if you do, this should be your go-to. It’s green, it contains (minimal amounts of) booze, and it’s delicious.

And if you really want to go wild on Pi Day, here are a few of my other past favorites from the blog:
Mock Cherry Pie
Penny Nejad’s Banana Meringue Pie
Lemon Atlantic Beach Pie
Bourbon Chocolate Pecan Pie
Hoosier Sugar Cream Pie

Happy Pi Day, everyone!


Hannah Spiegelman’s Family Haroset

Hannah Spiegelman

I’m so very excited to welcome my guest, Hannah Spiegelman, to the blog today! I first learned about Hannah through the magic of the Instagram algorithm when I had Emelyn Rude on the blog. I checked her out, liked what she was doing, and asked her to be on the blog–and I’m so pleased that she accepted!

What was she doing that I liked so much? Hannah has a blog called A Sweet History, where she shares ice cream concoctions that she’s created–inspired by history. Genius. Some of her recent combinations include the Queen of Song, an allspice ice cream with candied cranberries and hibiscus flowers, inspired by Flora Batson, a 19th-century concert singer; the O’Keefe, a raspberry frozen yogurt with bone broth caramel sauce, inspired by the painter Georgia O’Keefe; and a blueberry mint sumac sorbet, inspired by Blue Lake, a body of water located just north of Taos, New Mexico, believed by the Taos Pueblo Indians to be the birthplace of their people.

Hannah is originally from New Mexico, and attended Goucher College outside of Maryland to study history, eventually hoping to attend grad school for art history and enter the museum world. She’s been making ice cream, and experimenting with different flavors, since she was a sophomore in college. After college, she did an internship at the Holocaust Museum in D.C., traveled to South America, and did a stint working back in her hometown, before returning to Goucher for a research project about the women’s suffrage movement. While trying to make some extra money, Hannah started working at Little Baby’s Ice Cream and BLK//SUGAR in their shared space. The owner of BLK//SUGAR, Krystal Mack, helped Hannah “realize I could pretty easily connect my two passions (food and history) together. So in February 2016, I started my blog/Instagram where I share ice cream I made and the history that inspired it.”

When I asked Hannah if she would share a family recipe, she chose one that comes from her love of history and that was inspired by her grandfather: the Jewish dish haroset. “My grandfather, also a history major, had the most impact on my path in history,” she told me. “Starting at a very young age, he would tell me stories about experiences during WWII and Vietnam, college, and working as a U.S. Foreign Service diplomat.” It wasn’t just stories that her grandfather shared either. “My grandparents collected a lot of objects from their travels,” she said. “One of these objects was an Egyptian scarab figurine, which led to my interest in Egyptology, which then extended to my greater interest in history.”

The origin of the haroset recipe is more or less a mystery to the family. “My grandfather didn’t really talk about his family’s past (despite his obsession with history), but my family believes that this recipe came from my grandfather’s grandmother, who we believe was from Odessa, Ukraine (although it was probably part of Russia at the time),” she told me. Hannah had the chance to ask her relatives about this dish while taking a Russian Jewish history class in college. For a creative project, she chose to make an authentic Russian Jewish meal, including the family’s haroset. The research project gave Hannah a surprise. “It wasn’t until that project, after interviewing my grandpa, that I realized I was part Russian, and it was the first instance where I realized I could explore history through food.” I hear that, Hannah! (That’s what I love to do too, if you haven’t picked up on that yet.) “This year, my family has started a deeper exploration our family’s history, so this recipe is especially meaningful right now.” Food is a powerful tool for remembering and celebrating.

Haroset is dish served at the Passover Seder, which begins the eight-day celebration of the liberation of the Israelites from Egyptian slavery. The dish represents the mortar used by the slaves to make bricks. Hannah explained to me, “It is also one of the five or six foods on the Passover Seder plate. Depending on where your family is from, the recipe’s ingredients will vary. For instance, Israelis tend to incorporate dates in their haroset.” Food transmits the history, and history leaves its mark on the food.
At Hannah’s family Seder, the haroset recipe is the oldest guest. “While there are a lot of traditional foods surrounding every Jewish holiday, this recipe for haroset is the only ‘family’ recipe that goes back generations,” she said.




Passover Haroset

6 large or 8 small assorted apples, mainly sweet, but at least one Granny Smith
3 oz almonds, lightly toasted and chopped
2 tsp cinnamon
1/2 tsp nutmeg
1/2 cup golden raisins, plumped in water and cut in half
4 tbsp dry red wine
1 tbsp sugar


Peel and core the apples and cut into quarters.  Feed into food processor and finely chop, without turning into applesauce.  You may have to do this in two batches.

Add rest of the ingredients, and taste.  Add more wine and/or sugar if necessary.

Refrigerate overnight and taste again. Add more wine or sugar if needed. This haroset recipe shouldn’t be sweet, but the taste of the apples should be mellow.

Can be served straight, or on matzo.


As for where Hannah sees herself in the future, she told me, “I’m currently working on a couple commissions for the holiday season! This coming spring, I am organizing an ice cream workshop at the Walters Art Museum in Baltimore. A couple of ice cream pails from the 17th century were found in the collection, so the curator will talk about their fascinating history and I will do an ice cream demonstration using a piece from the collection as inspiration.” In the future, Hannah hopes to do more events focused on history and ice cream. She is currently applying for graduate programs focused on Food Studies.

If you’re interested in following Hannah’s creations, you can and should follow her on Instagram.

Hannah, thank you so much for taking the time to talk with me and share your family recipe. I can’t wait to see what delicious creations you make next!

Simple No-Churn Vanilla Ice Cream

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It’s finally feeling like summer here in Chicago. There have been several days of 80-plus degree weather. My favorite part is finally being able to go out without my shoulders covered, without getting cold (which I always am), even at night.

This type of weather also makes me start craving ice cream in a big way. I would not consider myself an ice cream person in general. But when that summer air hits in Chicago, it’s all I want and we start going through carton after carton of ice cream in our house. But maybe it’s in my genes?

Today would have been my grandma Edna’s 94th birthday. I have written about grandma Edna (known as Grandma Dini), and bragged about her general awesomeness, on here before when I made her cream puffs. Though her cream puffs were my favorite, they were not Grandma Dini’s favorite dessert. She was particularly partial to ice cream. Nothing fancy. Just plain vanilla ice cream. One bowl, right before bed.

There are three food memories that I have in relation to Grandma Dini. One, her cereal options…left a lot to be desired. She usually had only bland cereals, like corn flakes. But to make up for it, she had a giant sugar tin, with a circus scene on it and a lid that looked like the big top of a circus tent. I was allowed to go a little nuts sprinkling my cereal with sugar, attempting to make a little sugar-milk paste at the bottom of my bowl, like a sicko. Two, she made a kick-ass lemon meringue pie during the holidays. And, three, her non-holiday treat was ice cream. I don’t ever really remember her having any flavor other than vanilla. And when I asked for something chocolatey to put on it, instead of chocolate syrup, she’d sprinkle it with Nesquick. I’d stir everything together making a thick chocolate-milk-like mixture, happy as a clam.

So now that it’s hot out, and we’re celebrating Grandma Dini’s birthday, we’re going to make some ice cream. And I think it’s high time I learn to make my own, right here at home. It doesn’t hurt that it’s super easy and I don’t have to turn on my oven. Let’s go!

No-Churn Ice Cream

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Simple No-Churn Vanilla Ice Cream

14 oz can of sweetened condensed milk
1 tsp vanilla extract
1/8 tsp salt
2 cups heavy whipping cream


In a large mixing bowl, add the condensed milk, vanilla, and salt. Stir to combine completely.

In a separate mixing bowl, add heavy whipping cream. Using a hand mixer, or a whisk, beat until peaks form. (With a hand mixer, it took me about 2 1/2 minutes at medium-high speed.)

Fold the whipped cream into the condensed milk mixture until completely combined.

Pour the mixture into a pan that is at least 6 cups in volume and cover with a piece of parchment paper.

If you are adding in any extras, like cookies, nuts, or chopped fruit, freeze for two hours, mix in the add-ins, stir, then continue to freeze for 3 more hours.

Freeze for at least five hours, then scoop and serve!

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This recipe is awesome for the obvious benefit of not needing to purchase an ice cream machine. I saw a couple of recipes that involved taking the ice cream out and stirring it frequently as it froze, but this is even easier than that. This recipe couldn’t be simpler, tastier, and, four ingredients? Sign me up! The end result is that we now have a butt-load of vanilla ice cream. I guess the root beer float situation in this house is about to get real.

Note: I actually made this recipe twice. The first way used the condensed milk recipe you see above. The second used a combination of evaporated milk and sugar. (Condensed milk is basically sweetened evaporated milk.) I’m not a huge fan of the saccharine flavor of  condensed milk, which is basically just evaporated milk, plus sugar, so I thought I could trick the system. It didn’t work well for me. The taste was just OK. However, even I thought it needed more sugar, which is not usually the case. Also, not as important, it was much tougher to scoop. It seemed to break apart when I scooped it, almost like shaved ice, rather than ice cream. No complaints, though, as the condensed milk version’s sweetness was quite mellow once frozen. Also, if plain vanilla isn’t your style, you could always add your own fixins–cookie crumbles, fruit, chocolate. Just be sure to freeze the mixture a bit before you add them, so they don’t settle to the bottom.

Will I never buy store-bought ice cream again? Yes, I will. However, it’s neat to know this nifty little recipe. If grandma were still alive, I’d run right over to her house and show her how I made this. To which I’m sure she’d respond, “Yeah, I know how to make my own ice cream, I’m 94 years-old.” Happy birthday, Grandma Dini! And happy ice creaming to all!