Salted Honey Cantaloupe Popsicles

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We are rolling into summer, like, whoa. I still have a few things left on my summer food bucket list. Last weekend, I finally had a Polish sausage at a baseball game, so scratch that one off. Others include: making the Oreo cookie dessert that my mom used to make me when I was a kid, making a sour cherry pie, figuring out a non-cake dessert for Alex’s birthday next week, making a galette, because #summerofgalettes, visiting Spinning J for pie and a float, eating tacos at Rojo Gusano, having fried chicken and margaritas on the patio at Honey Butter Fried Chicken, and drinking Grasshoppers at every available location in the city. This is my life. Endlessly dictated by where to eat and what to make next.

Another bucket list item is to eat as much cantaloupe as humanly possible. I’m well on my way. I might be turning orange. I also just learned that what I have been eating and loving my whole life is muskmelon! Not cantaloupe! We’re sticking with calling it cantaloupe here, though, because I just can’t think of it any other way, and I am vehemently opposed to calling it muskmelon because it’s not exceptionally flattering.

Last year, my friend Kristina sent me this recipe for salted honey cantaloupe jam. We added to our list of must-makes. We still haven’t gotten around to making a jar, but there I was staring at another cantaloupe, thinking to myself, “What can I do with you?”

I don’t know why my immediate thought in the summer is not always “Popsicles!” But I got there. Eventually.

Salted Honey Cantaloupe Popsicles

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Salted Honey Cantaloupe Popsicles
Makes 6 popsicles.

Ingredients:
3 cups cantaloupe, thoroughly washed, rind removed, cubed
1/4 cup water
1/4 cup sugar
1/4 cup honey
3 tbsp lemon juice
1/2 tsp salt

Instructions:

In a saucepan, add cantaloupe, water, sugar, honey, lemon juice, and salt. Bring to a boil and allow to boil for about 5 minutes, just until fruit becomes soft enough to mash with the back of a spoon.

Remove from heat and allow to cool completely.

Using a blender or food processor, blend until the mixture is smooth.

Pour 1/3 cup of mixture into each popsicle mold. Leave about 1/4 of an inch at the top of the mold to allow for expansion.

Freeze the molds for about 1 hour, or until a popsicle stick inserted into the center holds straight. Continue to freeze for another 4 hours.

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I started my research trying to figure out where cantaloupes/muskmelons originated. Instead of learning much about that, though, I got swept away in a story about how a cantaloupe helped win World War II. Stay with me here…

In the 1920’s Alexander Fleming discovered mold growing in a petri dish, after returning from a summer break. After further testing Fleming discovered that the mold contained a powerful antibiotic. Years later, a German-Jewish doctor, Ernst Chain, discovered Fleming’s writings about the antibiotic, which because of lack of interest had been mostly neglected after its discovery. Shortly after England entered World War II, men were dying in battlefields, not from bullet wounds, but from infection. Chain, and his boss at Oxford University, Howard Florey, thought that this powerful antibiotic could be the answer to preventing thousands of deaths. However, they were unable to secure funding to continue their study in England, or anywhere else in war-ravaged Europe.

Instead, they looked West, to the United States. They approached the US Department of Agriculture, only a few decades old at that time, about working together to develop a way to mass produce Penicillin. In July, the two doctors arrived at the USDA’s offices in Peoria and began working with the team in America to create large batches of the antibiotic by combining it with corn steep liquor, but soon realized that they needed a more resilient mold to adequately increase their yields.

After spending weeks testing various moldy items, Kenneth Raper, a mycologist (fungi scientist) at the National Center for Agricultural Utilization Research, found what he was looking for in an overripe cantaloupe bought at a Peoria grocery store that would become known as “Moldy Mary”. The mold strain on the cantaloupe was 50 times stronger than that which was originally discovered by Fleming. Raper sent the strain to collaborating scientists throughout the country to find ways to mutate the mold and boost production. By 1944, 100 billion units of Penicillin were being created by pharmaceutical companies, in large part, to treat Allied troops after the D-Day Invasion. As presumed, Penicillin was able to save thousands of soldiers’ lives, and is thought to be partially responsible for the success of the Allies, and failure of German forces, who were still using less advanced drugs to treat infection.

My favorite melon. Patriotic. Saving lives. Amazing! Long story short, you should make popsicles. They don’t even have to be these popsicles. Just make some popsicles. It’s already July for crying out loud! Popsicles are awesome. Do I even have to tell you that?

Cherry Clafoutis for Bastille Day

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Try as I might the rest of the year, summer is perhaps the only time I get even close to an appropriate amount of fruits and vegetables. July is especially wonderful, because it just seems like everything is ripe, juicy, and delicious. Everyday, I pack leftover Talenti jars to the top with whatever fruits and veggies we have on hand, just to snack on. I think already this summer I’ve eaten more than my weight in cantaloupe, cucumbers, and cherries. Back when I made sweet cherry pie, I promised the world and myself that I would make tart cherry pie this summer. And I just saw Local Foods, a grocery store in Chicago that specifically sources from farmers and vendors in the Midwest, post a pic of their tart cherries on Insta, so I’m about to get on that.

But today I’m taking advantage of the overabundance of sweet cherries to make clafoutis to celebrate France’s national holiday, Bastille day! Is that a thing that Americans can celebrate? Did we get that right revoked when we started calling French fries, “Freedom fries”? I know that New Orleans has celebrations for Bastille Day, but those people, you know, have French last names.

I’ll be honest, until I was researching this post, I mostly associated Bastille Day with a Portlandia episode. Genealogically speaking, much of my family hails from England, so I’ve always been more Anglophile than Francophile. Sure, I had heard of Bastille Day. I knew that it is France’s national independence day. However, even as a student of history, I didn’t know how destroying a prison related to French independence.

Bastille Day (which is what English speakers call it–in France, it’s just the 14th of July, or the National Celebration), commemorates the storming of the Bastille. The Bastille was a fortress and political prison in Paris, used primarily by French monarchs to detain any number of prisoners, for any number of crimes. Because France was an absolute monarchy, meaning the King was in complete control of the government, prisoners sent to the Bastille could be kept there secretly and indefinitely without proper judicial process. The misuse of the Bastille became a symbol of Royal authority and tyrannical power. By 1789, revolution was being openly discussed by the French people and, in July, a group of 900 commoners gathered outside the nearly empty prison, to demand the release of guns and ammunition that had been stored there a few days earlier. After demands were not met and negotiations dragged on, the crowds stormed into the courtyard, and after hours of gunfire, a cease-fire was called, the doors were opened, and the crowd surged in.

The King at the time was Louis XVI, whose wife was Marie Antoinette. A few years after the Bastille was stormed, Louis would be established as a constitutional monarch, which would limit his power. In 1893, the French monarchy was dismantled altogether and Louis XVI, Marie Antoinette, and many of those close to them were tried and executed for treason.

The storming of the Bastille is considered a turning point in the Revolution which directly led to the establishment of France as a republic. There’s your very brief history lesson.

Cherry Clafoutis

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Cherry Clafoutis

Ingredients:
1/2 cup sugar
1/4 tsp salt
1 cup whole milk
1/2 tsp vanilla extract
1/2 tsp almond extract (can substitute another 1/2 tsp of vanilla)
3 large eggs
1/2 cup flour
2 tbsp unsalted butter
1 1/2 cups cherries (stone fruit or berries work well, too), pitted
Powdered sugar for serving, optional

Instructions:

Preheat oven to 400 degrees.

In a bowl, mix together the sugar and salt. Add the milk and the vanilla and almond extract. Beat in the three eggs. Finally, sift in the flour, whisking it as you pour. You can also do this in a blender or food processor. You want the mixture to be smooth and foamy.

Liberally grease a 10-inch skillet or dish with the butter.

Add the fruit to the bottom of the skillet or dish and pour the batter over the top.

Bake for about 30 minutes, until the middle is set and the top is golden brown.

Cool for a few minutes, dust with powdered sugar, and serve in wedges.

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If you’ve never had clafoutis before, you’re in for a treat. It’s very similar in texture and taste to a Dutch Baby. It’s less airy and more substantive, which is perfect, because sometimes Dutch Babies aren’t quite filling enough, even just for the two of us. Also, easiness level is high, especially if you have a cherry pitter on hand.

And, if you don’t have cherries on hand, use any kind of berry or stone fruit for this dish and it will turn out great. (If you want to be “that guy”, here’s a fun fact: When any other fruit besides cherries are used, it’s called a flaugnarde, not clafoutis.)

Also, traditionally the cherries in clafoutis would not be pitted. The pits of the cherries are supposed to give the dish a slight almond flavor. I pitted my cherries and just added some almond extract. However, if you don’t have it on hand, vanilla works great. This is one of those recipes that, if you do any home baking at all, you probably have the ingredients on hand right now.

Bonne fête nationale!

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Lemon Atlantic Beach Pie

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What? It’s July now? Where is time going?? As amazing as summer is in Chicago, it can sometimes feel like a sprint. Almost every single one of our summer weekends are already booked. I’m not complaining, of course. It’s just always amazing to me how, when warm weather finally arrives, Chicagoans rush to pack in every ounce of living that we can. It’s because we know that in a few months it will be dark and cold again and, as much as you’ll want to see your friends, you’ll want much more to stay inside, curl up on the couch, and watch TV. Anyway, we’re now in summer-mode, which means we’ve been outside far more than we’ve been inside, and baking seems like a distant memory to me. However, also with summer comes a slew of backyard BBQs, and the tricky question of what to contribute. Luckily for me, I have discovered the perfect potluck dessert solution: Lemon Atlantic Beach Pie.

My initial interest in this recipe sprung from my love of superstition. Along the coast of North Carolina, where seafood is a staple, an old wives’ tale says that eating dessert after consuming seafood will make you terribly sick–with the single exception of a lemon pie, made from condensed milk, with a cracker crust.

Atlantic Beach Pie is known up and down the North Carolina coast. Sometimes it is called Harker’s Island Pie, and sometimes Down East Lemon Milk Pie. While searching for recipes, I came upon many variations. Some used Ritz crackers for the crust, instead of saltines. Most recipes were topped with meringue, instead of whipped cream. And all recipes called for condensed milk, but some were very, very particular that Eagle Brand condensed milk had to be used.

What was once just a local favorite has been brought into the national spotlight by Bill Smith, chef at Crooks Corner in Chapel Hill, North Carolina. In 2014, Chef Smith’s recipe for Atlantic Beach Pie made its way around the internet and was featured on food websites, from NPR’s Found Recipes to Food52’s Genius Recipes.

Once you have a bite of this pie, you will understand why. It’s as though a key lime pie and lemon meringue pie had a baby. Salty, sweet, tart, and buttery; it’s a magical mix of simple flavors. Summer in a bite!

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Atlantic Beach Pie

Lemon Atlantic Beach Pie
Makes 1 9-inch pie. Slight variation of this recipe from NPR.

Ingredients:
For crust:
1 1/2 sleeves of saltine crackers
1/2 cup melted butter
3 tbsp sugar

For filling:
14 oz. sweetened condensed milk
4 egg yolks
1/2 cup combination of lemon and lime juice (about 2 large lemons, 1 small lime)

For whipped cream, optional:
1 cup heavy cream
1 tsp vanilla
2 tbsp powdered sugar
Sprinkle of sea salt, for garnish

Instructions:

Preheat oven to 350 degrees.

For crust:
In a food processor, or with your hands, crumble saltine crackers into very small pieces, but not into a powder.

Add sugar and combine. Add the melted butter and mix with your hands, continuing to crumble the saltines.

Pour into a pie pan and press with your hands until the crust is shaped to your liking.

Chill for 15 minutes, then bake for 18 minutes. Leave the oven on at 350 degrees.

Allow the crust to cool as you make the filling.

For the filling:
Add condensed milk and egg yolks to a bowl. Beat with a hand mixer (or in a stand mixer) until thoroughly combined, about 1 minute.

Add lemon and lime juice to the mixture and continue to mix very thoroughly, approximately one more minute.

Pour the filling into the pie shell and bake for 16 minutes, just until the filling has set.

Chill for at least an hour and a half. If topping with whipped cream, beat together 1 cup of heavy cream, vanilla, and sugar until soft peaks form.

Top cooled pie with whipped cream and a sprinkling of sea salt.

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In terms of pie, I really feel like I’ve found my “one”. It’s a perfect balance of flavors, and, honestly, one of the easiest desserts I’ve ever made. Little baking, very little fuss, and only 6 ingredients! Sheesh, you probably already have most of the ingredients in your house!

I already took it to a July 4th BBQ and I can’t imagine that I won’t be making it several more times this summer. If you’re looking for a simple dessert to impress people, give it a try. And, if you do, let me know. I want to see if other people are as impressed with it as I am. Three cheers for summer desserts and easy living!

Hummingbird Cake with Cream Cheese Frosting

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It’s summer now. As often as I can, I’m refusing to turn on my oven, which means we’re over here surviving entirely on pasta salad, BLTs, and whatever we can grill. So it’s not all bad. But we had a bit of a chilly spell (you know, low 60s), so I took the opportunity to make a cake that’s been on my mind: Hummingbird Cake.

On a personal note, this should not be a cake that’s been on my mind. I’m not a big fan of fruits and nuts in my cakes. But when I started doing the research for this post, I couldn’t get it out of my head. I became obsessed. I think I even had a dream about it! Plus, I love its name–even though, it turns out, Hummingbird Cake was not always its name.

In the United States, Hummingbird Cake is known as a Southern specialty, but it actually has its origins in Jamaica. The cake, made with both bananas and pineapple, was named after Jamaica’s national bird, the swallow-tail hummingbird. In Jamaica, though, it was known as Doctor Bird Cake, doctor bird being a nickname of the hummingbird.

In the 70’s, in an attempt to boost tourism to the island, media press kits containing Jamaican recipes, including Doctor Bird Cake, were sent to the United States. The earliest recipe for Doctor Bird Cake that I could find in U.S. newspapers was from February 26, 1972, in the Mexico Ledger of Mexico, Missouri, where the recipe is exactly the same as the one I made (but using only white sugar), with the exception of being cooked in a tube pan, apparently served without frosting.

By 1974, the same recipe was published in the The Brazosport Facts, a newspaper printed in Freeport, Texas, under the new name Hummingbird Cake. In 1975, there is another recipe for the cake, this time from Weimar, Texas, which is still cooked in a tube pan, but this time, with the addition of a cream cheese frosting.

In 1978, Southern Living Magazine published the recipe for Hummingbird Cake, attributing the recipe to an L.H. Wiggins of Greensboro, North Carolina. It was an instant hit. In 1990, it was voted Southern Living’s favorite recipe and at that time was their most-requested recipe ever.

This cake seems like a perfect way to kick off summer. Stuffed with banana and pineapple (seriously, there is the same amount of fruit as flour), it seems tropical and sunny. And, though summer in Chicago is nice, we could always still use some tropical and sunny vibes.

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Hummingbird Cake with Cream Cheese Frosting
Very slight variation of Southern Living’s recipe. Makes an 8 x 2-inch, three-layer cake.

Ingredients:
For the cake:
3 cups all-purpose flour
1 cup sugar
1 cup brown sugar
1 tsp salt
1 tsp baking soda
1 tsp cinnamon
3 eggs
1 1/2 cups vegetable oil
2 tsp vanilla extract
2 cups banana, diced (not mashed)
1 cup crushed pineapple, in juice
1 cup pecans, chopped

For the frosting:
16 oz cream cheese, softened
3/4 cup unsalted butter, softened
2 tsp vanilla extract
3 cups powdered sugar
1/4 tsp salt
1/2 cup pecan halves, optional

Instructions:

For the cake:
Preheat the oven to 350 degrees.

In a large bowl, combine the flour, sugar, brown sugar, salt, baking soda, and cinnamon.

Add the eggs, oil, and vanilla to the dry mixture. Stir with a wooden spoon or spatula just until the wet and dry ingredients have been incorporated. (The mixture will seem quite thick at this point.)

Add the pineapple, banana, and pecans to the mixture and incorporate thoroughly.

Divide the mixture equally between three 8″ x 2″ round pans (you could also use 9″ x 1/2″).

Bake for 23-28 minutes. Begin checking for doneness at the 22-minute mark. Cake is done when a toothpick inserted into the center comes out clean. Do not over-bake. The cake should be quite moist.

Allow to cool for at least an hour and a half.

For the frosting:
Combine the cream cheese, butter, and vanilla in a mixing bowl and beat with a hand mixer until combined.

Add the powdered sugar and salt and continue to mix until combined.

Frost as desired and decorate the top of the frosted cake with pecan halves.

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I’ve never thought of myself as a huge banana fan. Don’t get me wrong, I always thought they were fine, but it wasn’t until a month or two ago, when I made my friend Kaye’s grandma’s banana pudding recipe and then ate, you know, ALL OF IT, that I was like, “Wait, am I a banana-eater now?” I still don’t just want to hang out and eat a banana, but do I want them in my desserts? Hell yes I do! The pineapple seems to brighten up the flavor of the banana, which I usually find a bit heavy. And the banana tones down the pineapple, which can really enter a room and take over the conversation. Plus, there are nuts in it! I believed until this point that I was strictly a no-nuts dessert type of gal, but my sensibilities are being tested all over the place with this recipe. It’s so good.

And, it couldn’t be easier! Everything comes together quickly and no stand or hand mixer is required or even recommended. The most handsome cake, it is not. But if you’re looking for a tasty and impressive dessert for a group (seriously, though, this is a hefty cake that could feed a crowd), this is the cake you’ve been looking for.

Mandy Ross’ Sweet and Salty Chex Mix

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I’m very excited to be joined by Mandy Ross, the woman behind the very popular Instagram account, Paper of the Past, where she shares her collection of vintage scrapbooks dating from the 1850s to the 1940s. Each post beautifully displays a few pages from the collection, alongside the name of the owner, and often some details about them and even some of their own words. When I asked how she got interested in collecting scrapbooks, Mandy told me, “To me, old scrapbooks are time capsules in book form. They combine stories and mystery with a bit of an underdog vibe. For one reason or another, they have been discarded or lost, and need a good home. Each book tells a story, but I have to dig around to piece that story together.” I have my friend Sarah to thank for introducing me to Mandy’s Instagram, but many more discovered her before I did. She started her account in the summer of 2016 and now has over 16,000 followers, who enjoy her glimpses into personal pasts. Mandy adds, “Not only do I enjoy the investigative process of unraveling the story, but also putting those memories back out in the world via Instagram.”

Obviously, whenever I have a guest on the blog, I ask them to share a family recipe. When I first reached out to Mandy, she wasn’t sure which recipe she would provide, but she knew immediately it would be something that her grandmother made. I told her that the emphasis of my blog is always the significance of the recipe, meaning it’s often something so ingrained in a family’s life that it’s hardly noticed. After some thought, Mandy told me the story of her grandmother’s Chex Mix recipe. “I visit my grandparents in Phoenix before Christmas each year. We make Chex Mix, listen to oldies, and play cards for three or four hours a day. Actually, we play cards while we wait for the Chex Mix to bake. I keep my phone in another room (most of the time) and they don’t have internet. In winter, it’s sunny but cold in Phoenix. We watch birds and rabbits running around in their backyard. There’s a grapefruit tree, cacti, and hummingbirds. It’s very peaceful. Their house is full of antiques and old family photos. Throughout the years, it’s been the same relaxing visit. No matter how much my own life changes, the Chex Mix process and card-playing stays the same.”

“It’s very simple, but the process holds a lot of great memories for me,” Mandy says. She and her grandmother still make the mix every year. “We make a few batches for me to pack in my suitcase and share with the rest of my family in San Diego. So, even though it’s a recipe that my grandma and I share, my family enjoys the tradition as well.”

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Mandy Ross’ Sweet and Salty Chex Mix

Ingredients:
3 cups Corn Chex cereal
3 cups Rice Chex cereal
3 cups Honey Nut Chex cereal
1 cup mixed nuts
1 cup pretzels
1 cup Cheez-It crackers
6 tbsp butter
2 tbsp Worcestershire sauce
1 1/2 tsp seasoned salt
3/4 tsp garlic powder
1/2 tsp onion powder

Instructions:

Preheat oven to 250 degrees.

In an un-greased large roasting pan, melt butter in the oven.

Stir in Worcestershire sauce, seasoned salt, garlic powder, and onion powder.

Stir in cereals, mixed nuts, pretzels, and Cheez-Its until coated.

Bake for 1 hour, stirring every 15 minutes.

Spread on paper towels or wax paper until cooled.

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Mandy’s grandmother “grew up in a big happy family in Southern California.” She owned and managed a beauty salon, and still does her friends’ hair. She also exercised her creativity through her hobbies of making porcelain dolls, sewing, and painting ceramics. Mandy says, “If she were in her twenties now, I think she would have a successful Etsy shop. My house is full of blankets, coasters, dishes, hanging towels, and bags that she made for me.”

Mandy says that her grandmother is partially responsible for her path. “She taught me the importance of having a lifelong hobby. Both her and my grandpa have creative hobbies that bring a lot of joy into their life. She also taught me it’s OK to have an entire room, or area, of your house dedicated to your passion. I live in a one-bedroom townhouse, with minimal space, but have converted my dining area into a scrapbook library. My grandma has a sewing room and a guestroom full of fabric.”

As interest in her work grows, Mandy is seeing more opportunities arise. “In the future, I expect to do more collaborations and tell the stories in more detail. I’d love to create a YouTube channel and share flip-through videos or un-boxing videos. My goal for the second year is to use Instagram to branch out into non-Instagram projects. I’d love to visit more library collections and also organize a small exhibit in San Francisco.” One particular scrapbook has already blossomed into its own research project—Mandy will visit Luxembourg soon to research the owner of the scrapbook, which contains love letters from a Luxembourger woman named Suzie to an American man. (You can even follow along with Mandy on her journey by searching #findingsuziekonz on Instagram.)

Mandy, thank you so much for taking the time to talk with me today and share you and your grandmother’s recipe! I can’t wait to see what’s in store for you next!

Homemade Strawberry Hand Tarts

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Picture this: It’s the first week of summer vacation. I am a scrawny kid, probably 80 lbs., soaking wet, likely wearing uneven, homemade jean cut-off shorts and an oversized Marlboro shirt that my dad got when he bought a carton of cigarettes (don’t smoke!). More than likely barefoot and even more likely, eating Pop-Tarts. That was me, every summer, from approximately 1993 to 1998.

Alex and I stopped by my hometown on our way to and from a wedding in Cleveland on Memorial Day weekend, which was bringing up all kinds of warm feelings. On Memorial Day weekend, if I were 11 again, I would have been running around in my friends’ back yards, with all of the other neighbor kids, until the very last second before the sun went down. Then my dad would yell my name or, more likely, my nickname out the backdoor and it would be time to come in for the night. It was making me all nostalgic for childhood and, of course, Pop-Tarts.

For the most part, I try to lead a healthy life. I work out, I eat lots of vegetables, and yes, I make a lot of desserts for this blog, but for the most part, but I usually end up giving a lot of what I make away (after I taste it of course–quality control, you know). On top of that, I really try to avoid eating too many overly-processed foods now, which is a real struggle for me. Being a 90’s kid from small town Indiana means that I am, as my friend Kristina puts it, “90% Ecto Cooler and other preservatives.” For example, nowadays, I never buy Pop-Tarts, even though I love them so much.

Incidentally, the Pop-Tarts that we know and love may never have been. In early 1963, Kellogg’s competitor, the cereal company Post, had announced a plan to release a new breakfast item called Country Squares. However, Post was still months away from releasing their item, which allowed Kellogg to swoop in and develop their own version. In their attempt to best their competitor, Kellogg reached out to Keebler, the famous cookie makers, to create a quick breakfast that could be heated in the toaster.

Perhaps we owe our greatest debt to Bill Post, a plant manager at Keebler during this time who was tasked with creating a toastable treat. (Bill Post appears to have no relation to the Post corporation, but I’m looking into whether there’s a cereal gene in the Post family.) He tested out versions, originally called “fruit scones,” on his children and they were a hit. Pop-Tarts were first tested in markets in Cleveland at the end of 1963. People loved them and they were released to the general public in 1964. They were unfrosted at the time, and only came in four flavors: blueberry, apple-currant, brown sugar cinnamon, and (my personal favorite) strawberry. A few years later, after Bill Post convinced executives that there was a way to create a toaster-safe frosting, frosted versions were made available.

Though I might not buy Pop-Tarts anymore, my cravings for warm, frosted, strawberry goo-filled treats have not diminished. Especially in the summer. I don’t know what it is. So, I made my own version at home.

Strawberry Hand Pies

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Homemade Strawberry Hand Tarts
Makes about 10 2 1/2 x 4-inch tarts.

Ingredients:

For the crust (using this recipe):
1 1/2 cups flour
1 tbsp sugar
3/4 tsp salt
9 tbsp (1 stick, plus 1 tbsp) unsalted butter, cubed and very cold
1/4 cup-1/3 cup very cold water
3/4 tsp apple cider vinegar
Egg wash, optional:
1 egg
1 tsp water

For the filling:
1 cup fresh strawberries, hulled and quartered
1-2 tbsp water
1/2 tsp cornstarch
2 tbsp sugar
1/8 tsp lemon zest
1/2 tsp lemon juice
pinch of salt
1/4 tsp vanilla

For the glaze:
1/4 cup powdered sugar
1/4 tsp vanilla
pinch of salt
1-2 tsp milk

Colored sugar or sprinkles, optional

Instructions:

In a food processor, combine the flour, sugar, and salt. Briefly pulse to mix. Add cold, cubed butter and process again until small clumps form, about 5-7 seconds. Add in 1/4 cup of water and apple cider vinegar. Pulse for an additional 5 seconds to combine. If the dough is still dry, add cold water one tablespoon at a time, not exceeding 1/2 cup.

On a well-floured surface, pour out the contents of the food processor. Gather the mixture, separate into two piles and form a disc out of each pile. Wrap in plastic wrap and refrigerate at least an hour, preferable overnight.

In a saucepan, combine strawberries, water, cornstarch, sugar, lemon zest, lemon juice, and salt. Heat on medium, stirring occasionally, until the mixture is boiling. Boil for about 15 minutes. Lower the heat and continue to cook for an additional 15 minutes. Remove from heat and stir in the vanilla. Set aside to cool completely.

Preheat oven to 350 degrees.

On a well-floured surface, roll out the pie dough. The pie crust should be quite thin, only about 1/8-inch thick, but you shouldn’t be able to see through the crust. You should be able to get about 10 rectangles from each disc, if you cut them 2 1/2 x 4-inches.

Place each rectangle on two large parchment paper-covered baking sheets. Spoon about one tablespoon of the cooled strawberry mixture into the middle of 10 of the rectangles. Place an empty rectangle over the top, carefully pressing down the edges. Then, seal the edges with the tines of a fork. Continue until all 10 tarts are filled. If using an egg wash, beat together one egg, with one teaspoon of water. Using the same fork, poke several holes into the top of each tart. Brush egg wash lightly on each tart.

Bake for 30 minutes, turning the baking sheet 180 degrees halfway through baking.

Remove from baking sheet to a cooling rack and allow to cool completely.

Mix together the powdered sugar, vanilla, salt, and milk in a small bowl. Spoon one teaspoon of glaze over each cooled tart. Sprinkle with colored sugar or sprinkles, if desired.

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No, they’re not healthy per se. They are basically made from butter and sugar, but I guess you’re replacing the high-fructose corn syrup? Pick your poison, I suppose. I also don’t feel bad about not buying Pop-Tarts because their sales have increased every year since they were introduced. There are plenty of latchkey kids out there, like I was, looking for an easy snack. Then those kids become adults and say, “No, I’m too good for Pop-Tarts, I’ll make my own.” But they’ll secretly have a moment of yearning, every time they walk by them at the grocery store. Or, so I’ve heard…

The Queen’s Chocolate Perfection Pie

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It’s good to be back in the saddle again. I took a brief break from the blog to have a lovely visit to the Pacific Northwest with Alex. We had such a good time, driving all over northwestern Washington, before spending our last few days exploring Seattle. Alex had a conference to attend in Seattle, so I had a lot of time to walk around alone and remember how to eat lunch by myself. I sincerely value the art of doing things by yourself, but it’s a skill, so it was nice to get some practice in. And we still got to spend loads of time together, walking 25,000 steps a day (not an exaggeration) and seeing the city. And luckily Spring had sprung in Chicago while we were gone, and we had warm-ish weather and flowers on the trees to greet us. But here I am, back to the blog I love the most. This time, I’m making pie!

Just last week, Alex asked which famous person I would be completely awed by if I met them. Without hesitation, I answered: Queen Elizabeth II. Of course! She’s more than famous. She’s walking, talking history! That gal has lived through so much. And not only that, she’s ruled through it. 2017 marks her 65th year on the throne!

My very serious confession is that I am 100% totally crazy about the Queen. I’m sure it’s not the most popular position to take, but that’s just how I feel. Of course I understand other folks’ mixed feelings about royalty in general. They can be stodgy and out of touch, they are an expense to the British people… but the Queen. She’s a fascinating figure and I love her. I admire her stoicism, dignity, and commitment to her role. It should also be noted that I owe a big part of my interest in genealogy to royalty. When I was a kid, before we had a computer (remember that?) I used to go through our encyclopedias making family trees of the British royals. (That may be the more serious confession right there.)

Today Queen Elizabeth turns 91 years-old, although her birthday won’t officially be celebrated until June (from what I understand, it’s because the weather is generally better then). But, in honor of this incredible lady’s actual day of birth, I made Chocolate Perfection Pie. A former chef to the Queen recently disclosed that this was her favorite dessert. The pie consists of, get this, a shortbread crust, followed by layers of cinnamon custard, chocolate sauce, cinnamon whipped topping, and chocolate-cinnamon whipped topping. I’m on board. And if it’s good enough for the Queen…

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The Queen’s Chocolate Perfection Pie
Very slightly adapted from this recipe.

Ingredients:
For the crust:
1 3/4 cups all-purpose flour
1/4 cup granulated sugar
Pinch of salt
1 stick unsalted butter, chilled and cubed
1 egg yolk
1/4 – 1/2 cup heavy cream
1/2 tsp vanilla extract

For the filling and toppings:
2 eggs
1/2 tsp ground cinnamon
1/2 cup granulated sugar
1/2 tsp apple cider vinegar
1/4 tsp salt

6 oz. chopped semi-sweet chocolate
1/2 cup water
2 egg yolks

1 cup heavy cream
1/2 tsp ground cinnamon

Dark chocolate or white chocolate bar, optional

Instructions:

For the crust:
Preheat oven to 350 degrees.

Grease a pie or tart pan and set aside.

In a large bowl or food processor, combine the flour, sugar, and salt.

Add in very cold butter cubes. If using a food processor, process for about 5 seconds, until the butter is incorporated and is in small pea-sized pieces. If using a bowl, incorporate the butter into the dry ingredients, pinching between your fingers to achieve pea-sized pieces.

Add egg yolk, 1/4 cup of heavy cream, and vanilla extract. Process or mix by hand until combined. Pinch the dough in your hand. If it holds, it’s ready. If not, add more heavy cream, 1 tablespoon at a time, until the dough holds together. Do not exceed 1/2 cup of heavy cream.

Pour the crumbs into the tart or pie pan, and use your fingers to shape to the bottom and sides.

Line the interior of the crust with parchment paper, fill with dry beans or pie weights. Bake on a cookie sheet for 20-25 minutes. Remove the crust from the oven and remove the pie weights and parchment paper. Poke holes all over the bottom of the pie crust with a fork. Return to the oven and continue baking for about 5 minutes, or until the bottom of the pie crust begins to turn light brown. Remove from oven and allow to cool almost completely.

For the filling and toppings:
Make a double boiler, using a glass or metal mixing bowl over a saucepan of boiling water. Whisking constantly, combine the eggs, sugar, cinnamon, vinegar, and salt in the bowl. The mixture will begin to foam around the edges. Once this occurs, remove from the heat and continue whisking until the mixture becomes creamy and ribbons begin to form. Pour the mixture into the bottom of the crust and bake for 15-20 minutes, until the custard just sets and begins to rise. The surface should be firm to the touch, but not hard. Allow the custard to sink and cool slightly.

In a small saucepan, or in a glass bowl in the microwave, melt the semi-sweet chocolate. Add in 1/2 cup room temperature water and whisk until the water and melted chocolate are combined. Add one egg yolk, whisking in completely before adding the second yolk and whisk completely. Pour half of the mixture (about 1/2 cup) onto the custard in the pie shell. Do not discard the remaining syrup! Bake for about 5-8 minutes. Set on a cooling rack and allow to completely cool.

In a mixing bowl, combine the whipping cream and cinnamon. Beat with a whisk or hand mixer until stiff peaks form. Spread half of the mixture onto the chocolate layer.

Stir together the remaining whipped cream and chocolate syrup until fully combined. Add that layer on top of the cinnamon whipped cream layer.

Shave the dark chocolate or white chocolate bar and sprinkle the shavings over the top of the pie.

Refrigerate for at least one hour before serving.

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The love of cinnamon-flavored, and particularly cinnamon-chocolate-flavored, desserts in the Limanowski household cannot be understated. Examples of that on this blog are here and here. We were more than happy to add another cinnamon-chocolate dish to the rotation and this one, just as its name says, is perfection. It might seem like a lot of steps, but it’s actually quite easy. Give it a try and let me know what you think!

Long live the Queen!