Mini S’mores Pavlovas

Mini S'mores Pavlovas13

This post could have been about ice cream cones. I’ve really been down deep in state history the last few weeks. The ice cream cone has a fun little history, it’s the state dessert of Missouri, and August 10th is Missouri’s anniversary as a state. But today is, wait for it, National S’mores Day. S’mores! So how could I resist making a S’mores recipe? Especially when they’re as cute as these little Mini S’mores Pavlovas?

Leave it to me to take a beautiful, elegant dessert, like the pavlova, and turn it into the equivalent of a smash cake. The idea of making a S’mores pavlova came to me when I made a regular pavlova last winter and Alex kept saying how much it tasted like a toasted marshmallow. That got me thinking how the base of a pavlova is really just 1/3 of a s’more.

The first “recipe” for S’mores was published in 1927 in the book Tramping and Trailing with the Girl Scouts. The recipe published in this book called them Some Mores, which of course was later abbreviated–thank goodness. As everyone 90 years later knows, they are composed of a rectangle of chocolate and a toasted marshmallow sandwiched between two graham cracker squares.

The snack, in the 20s, would have been both portable, and may even have been considered healthy. Why? The root pulp of the marshmallow plant has been used for thousands of years for medicinal and confectionery purposes, from ancient Rome, Egypt, and parts of Western Asia. However, the process for creating medicine or candy from marshmallows was lengthy and costly, so it was a delicacy reserved only for the higher classes.

By the Middle Ages, marshmallow root was being used in Europe to relieve minor irritations, such as sore throats. Eventually, French confectioners began whipping the sap into a spongy substance together with egg and sugar, which would be more recognizable as today’s marshmallows. When the marshmallow made it to the United States, in the early 1900s, mallow had been replaced by gelatin (basically stripping it of any health benefits). There it was sold in tins for mass consumption.

The graham cracker was inspired, in part by a 19th-century minister, Sylvester Graham. Graham believed that practicing temperance, abstinence, and vegetarianism was the only healthy and pure way to live. While he did not invent graham crackers, his propagation of eating only whole grains led to the creation of the graham bread, and graham crackers.

In the 1890’s, Milton S. Hershey owned a successful caramel company, but after witnessing the chocolate-making process at the World’s Columbian Exposition in Chicago in 1893, he sold his caramel company and, by 1900, he was creating his Hershey Chocolate Bar.

Around the early 1900’s, someone had already figured out that these three were a match made in heaven. By 1927, when the S’mores recipe was published, there were other chocolate-marshmallow snacks already on the market, including Moon Pies and Mallomars. Perhaps the girl scouts were trying to recreate a treat they had already had before.

Mini S'mores Pavlovas11

Mini S'mores Pavlovas

Mini S'mores Pavlovas4

Mini S'mores Pavlovas9.jpg

Mini S’mores Pavlovas
Makes one 9-inch pavlova or eight 1-layer or four 2-layer pavlovas.

Ingredients:
Pavlova:
4 large egg whites
1 cup sugar
1 1/2 tsp cornstarch
1 tsp vanilla extract
1 tsp lemon juice

Topping:
1 cup heavy whipping cream
1 tbsp sugar
1 tsp vanilla extract

3-5 graham crackers, crushed

4 oz semi-sweet chocolate chips
1/2 cup heavy whipping cream

Instructions:

Preheat oven to 250 degrees.

Line a large cookie sheet (12″ x 18″) with parchment paper. Outline eight circles using the the mouth of a drinking glass, about 2 1/2 inches in diameter, onto the parchment paper with a pencil. Flip the parchment over on the baking sheet, so the pencil markings are face down.

In a very clean, very dry mixing bowl (or stand mixer bowl), add 4 egg whites. Be sure there are no yolk remnants.

Mix together the sugar and cornstarch in a separate small bowl and combine.

Begin beating the egg whites on medium speed, until you notice that the mixture becomes frothy, and then smooth. You will begin to notice soft peaks.

Add the cornstarch-sugar mixture to the egg whites two tbsp at a time, beating for about 30 seconds in between each addition, gradually increasing the speed of your mixer during each addition.

Add the vanilla and lemon juice and mix for 30 more seconds to make sure everything is combined.

Immediately after mixing, spoon or pipe the mixture into each of the eight circles on the parchment paper.

Bake for 50 minutes at 250 degrees, then turn off oven and allow the pavlovas to cool in the oven for 10 minutes, without opening the door.

As you wait for the pavlovas, begin making the remaining ingredients. For the whipped cream, whip together 1 cup of heavy cream, 1 tbsp sugar, and 1 tsp vanilla. Keep in refrigerator until you’re ready to use. For the ganache, add the chocolate to a heat-safe bowl. Heat the 1/2 cup of heavy cream until it’s just beginning to simmer. Pour the simmering cream over the chocolate and allow to sit for 10 minutes. After 10 minutes, begin stirring the mixture and it will begin to form a smooth, dark ganache. Allow to cool completely before using. Crush the graham crackers with your hands or in a food processor. Set aside.

Remove the pavlovas from the oven and transfer to a cooling rack for about 10 minutes, until completely cool.

Arrange pavlovas on individual plates. Top with whipped cream, chocolate, and graham crackers.

Serve immediately.

Mini S'mores Pavlovas12

There is no marshmallow sap in this pavlova, just a simple combination of five ingredients, baked in the oven instead of toasted over an open fire, drizzled with chocolate and sprinkled with graham cracker dust. Perfect for when you’re around a dinner table, instead of a campfire. (And, if you’re worried about the fact that you’ll have 4 leftover egg yolks, I know a great banana pudding recipe that uses that many exactly!)

Peace out, Girl Scout!
Save

Advertisements