Mini S’mores Pavlovas

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This post could have been about ice cream cones. I’ve really been down deep in state history the last few weeks. The ice cream cone has a fun little history, it’s the state dessert of Missouri, and August 10th is Missouri’s anniversary as a state. But today is, wait for it, National S’mores Day. S’mores! So how could I resist making a S’mores recipe? Especially when they’re as cute as these little Mini S’mores Pavlovas?

Leave it to me to take a beautiful, elegant dessert, like the pavlova, and turn it into the equivalent of a smash cake. The idea of making a S’mores pavlova came to me when I made a regular pavlova last winter and Alex kept saying how much it tasted like a toasted marshmallow. That got me thinking how the base of a pavlova is really just 1/3 of a s’more.

The first “recipe” for S’mores was published in 1927 in the book Tramping and Trailing with the Girl Scouts. The recipe published in this book called them Some Mores, which of course was later abbreviated–thank goodness. As everyone 90 years later knows, they are composed of a rectangle of chocolate and a toasted marshmallow sandwiched between two graham cracker squares.

The snack, in the 20s, would have been both portable, and may even have been considered healthy. Why? The root pulp of the marshmallow plant has been used for thousands of years for medicinal and confectionery purposes, from ancient Rome, Egypt, and parts of Western Asia. However, the process for creating medicine or candy from marshmallows was lengthy and costly, so it was a delicacy reserved only for the higher classes.

By the Middle Ages, marshmallow root was being used in Europe to relieve minor irritations, such as sore throats. Eventually, French confectioners began whipping the sap into a spongy substance together with egg and sugar, which would be more recognizable as today’s marshmallows. When the marshmallow made it to the United States, in the early 1900s, mallow had been replaced by gelatin (basically stripping it of any health benefits). There it was sold in tins for mass consumption.

The graham cracker was inspired, in part by a 19th-century minister, Sylvester Graham. Graham believed that practicing temperance, abstinence, and vegetarianism was the only healthy and pure way to live. While he did not invent graham crackers, his propagation of eating only whole grains led to the creation of the graham bread, and graham crackers.

In the 1890’s, Milton S. Hershey owned a successful caramel company, but after witnessing the chocolate-making process at the World’s Columbian Exposition in Chicago in 1893, he sold his caramel company and, by 1900, he was creating his Hershey Chocolate Bar.

Around the early 1900’s, someone had already figured out that these three were a match made in heaven. By 1927, when the S’mores recipe was published, there were other chocolate-marshmallow snacks already on the market, including Moon Pies and Mallomars. Perhaps the girl scouts were trying to recreate a treat they had already had before.

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Mini S’mores Pavlovas
Makes one 9-inch pavlova or eight 1-layer or four 2-layer pavlovas.

Ingredients:
Pavlova:
4 large egg whites
1 cup sugar
1 1/2 tsp cornstarch
1 tsp vanilla extract
1 tsp lemon juice

Topping:
1 cup heavy whipping cream
1 tbsp sugar
1 tsp vanilla extract

3-5 graham crackers, crushed

4 oz semi-sweet chocolate chips
1/2 cup heavy whipping cream

Instructions:

Preheat oven to 250 degrees.

Line a large cookie sheet (12″ x 18″) with parchment paper. Outline eight circles using the the mouth of a drinking glass, about 2 1/2 inches in diameter, onto the parchment paper with a pencil. Flip the parchment over on the baking sheet, so the pencil markings are face down.

In a very clean, very dry mixing bowl (or stand mixer bowl), add 4 egg whites. Be sure there are no yolk remnants.

Mix together the sugar and cornstarch in a separate small bowl and combine.

Begin beating the egg whites on medium speed, until you notice that the mixture becomes frothy, and then smooth. You will begin to notice soft peaks.

Add the cornstarch-sugar mixture to the egg whites two tbsp at a time, beating for about 30 seconds in between each addition, gradually increasing the speed of your mixer during each addition.

Add the vanilla and lemon juice and mix for 30 more seconds to make sure everything is combined.

Immediately after mixing, spoon or pipe the mixture into each of the eight circles on the parchment paper.

Bake for 50 minutes at 250 degrees, then turn off oven and allow the pavlovas to cool in the oven for 10 minutes, without opening the door.

As you wait for the pavlovas, begin making the remaining ingredients. For the whipped cream, whip together 1 cup of heavy cream, 1 tbsp sugar, and 1 tsp vanilla. Keep in refrigerator until you’re ready to use. For the ganache, add the chocolate to a heat-safe bowl. Heat the 1/2 cup of heavy cream until it’s just beginning to simmer. Pour the simmering cream over the chocolate and allow to sit for 10 minutes. After 10 minutes, begin stirring the mixture and it will begin to form a smooth, dark ganache. Allow to cool completely before using. Crush the graham crackers with your hands or in a food processor. Set aside.

Remove the pavlovas from the oven and transfer to a cooling rack for about 10 minutes, until completely cool.

Arrange pavlovas on individual plates. Top with whipped cream, chocolate, and graham crackers.

Serve immediately.

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There is no marshmallow sap in this pavlova, just a simple combination of five ingredients, baked in the oven instead of toasted over an open fire, drizzled with chocolate and sprinkled with graham cracker dust. Perfect for when you’re around a dinner table, instead of a campfire. (And, if you’re worried about the fact that you’ll have 4 leftover egg yolks, I know a great banana pudding recipe that uses that many exactly!)

Peace out, Girl Scout!
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Chocolate Krispy Treat Sandwiches

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My favorite human turns 30 years old today! I’ve made no secret of the fact that I love birthdays (my birthday! friends’ birthdays! strangers’ birthdays!). I also believe that birthdays should be celebrated for no less than a month, particularly if they are 30th birthdays! Alex doesn’t agree. He doesn’t like celebrations, particularly if they are celebrating him. He also doesn’t like cake, which I will never understand.

So, instead, we started celebrating last week, a whole three weeks shy of full birthday celebration. Per his request, we saw the anxiety-inducing Dunkirk on opening night at the Music Box. (Really, truly spectacular, if your heart can take it.) Tonight, we will have a nice dinner and some drinks. Tomorrow, we’re both taking off work and making a special trip to Werewolf Coffee Bar, and going to Sunset Pho Caffe for dinner with Alex’s dad. This weekend, we’ll probably make our way over to the Newberry Library’s Book Fair and celebrate with some friends. And, before the weekend is over, I suspect we’ll eat more than a few hot dogs. (Alex claims to never have food cravings, but this man has been talking about hot dogs, like, a lot.) For dessert, we will not have birthday cake.

Since cake was off the table, I tried to plan a celebratory dessert that captured the genius that is my wacky husband. Things I know about Alex are this: He is particularly fond of chocolate. A chocolate fiend, in fact. He’s been known to devour entire bags of semi-sweet chocolate chips. So, chocolate, sure, we’re getting somewhere.

The sandwich cookie is also a favorite. Alex’s love of cookies, particularly cookie sandwiches, knows zero bounds. His Instagram handle is @eatingcookies. No joke. (Don’t go looking for cookies there, though. He mostly takes pictures of garbage during our walks around the city.)

Finally, when I ask him about desserts he would like to try, they are almost never fancy. A while back, out of the blue, he mentioned he had read an article about an Australian snack called Chocolate Crackles. Essentially, this is a cupcake-shaped, chocolate Rice Krispies treat.

So, I combined the three, chocolate, cookie sandwiches, and Crackles, into a dessert truly fit for a 30-year-old man’s birthday.

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Chocolate Krispy Treat Sandwiches
Makes 24 rounds; 12 filled sandwiches. Slightly adapted from this recipe.

Ingredients:
For krispy treats:
6 tbsp unsalted butter, plus more for greasing the cookie sheet
1/8 tsp salt
10 1/2 oz bag of marshmallows
6 oz semi-sweet chocolate, roughly chopped
3 tbsp cocoa powder
1 tsp vanilla extract
7 cups rice cereal (like Rice Krispies)

For filling:
1 cup creamy peanut butter
1/2 tsp salt
5-6 tbsp powdered sugar
1 tsp vanilla
1/2 cup heavy cream

Instructions:
For krispy treats:
Butter a 12″ x 18″ cookie sheet.

In a large saucepan, melt 6 tbsp of butter over low to medium heat.

Once melted, add the salt, marshmallows, semi-sweet chocolate, and cocoa powder. Stir until combined and the marshmallows have completely melted. Remove from heat. Add the vanilla.

Add the rice cereal and stir until completely coated.

Immediately pour onto the buttered cookie sheet. Using your hands, or a spatula, press the mixture into the pan, filling to the edges. If you have a bit of leftover butter from the stick you used, you may find it helpful to cover your fingertips or the spatula with a bit of the butter while pressing to keep the mixture from sticking.

Once you have completely filled the pan with an even layer, refrigerate for about 15 minutes.

Using a 2 1/2-in round cookie or biscuit cutter, punch out 24 circles and move to another cookie sheet or plate.

For filling:
In a small bowl, beat the peanut butter, salt, powdered sugar, and vanilla until completely combined and smooth. In a separate bowl, beat the heavy cream until it forms stiff peaks. Add the heavy cream to the peanut butter mixture and fold together until combined.

Fill two rounds with peanut butter cream, press together, and enjoy!

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So, to recap–Rice Krispies Treats are good. Chocolate Rice Krispies Treats are better! Chocolate Rice Krispies Treats, filled with peanut butter cream are the best of all! Maybe they’re not the most grown-up dessert. No, they’re definitely not. But, being a grown-up is overrated anyway. Even as I was writing this last sentence, my brain was thinking, “You know what would be really good? Some peanut butter ice cream smooshed between two chocolate Rice Krispies Treats!” Omg brb gtg make some ice cream sandwiches!

Happy birthday, my love. Welcome to your 30’s!

The Queen’s Chocolate Perfection Pie

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It’s good to be back in the saddle again. I took a brief break from the blog to have a lovely visit to the Pacific Northwest with Alex. We had such a good time, driving all over northwestern Washington, before spending our last few days exploring Seattle. Alex had a conference to attend in Seattle, so I had a lot of time to walk around alone and remember how to eat lunch by myself. I sincerely value the art of doing things by yourself, but it’s a skill, so it was nice to get some practice in. And we still got to spend loads of time together, walking 25,000 steps a day (not an exaggeration) and seeing the city. And luckily Spring had sprung in Chicago while we were gone, and we had warm-ish weather and flowers on the trees to greet us. But here I am, back to the blog I love the most. This time, I’m making pie!

Just last week, Alex asked which famous person I would be completely awed by if I met them. Without hesitation, I answered: Queen Elizabeth II. Of course! She’s more than famous. She’s walking, talking history! That gal has lived through so much. And not only that, she’s ruled through it. 2017 marks her 65th year on the throne!

My very serious confession is that I am 100% totally crazy about the Queen. I’m sure it’s not the most popular position to take, but that’s just how I feel. Of course I understand other folks’ mixed feelings about royalty in general. They can be stodgy and out of touch, they are an expense to the British people… but the Queen. She’s a fascinating figure and I love her. I admire her stoicism, dignity, and commitment to her role. It should also be noted that I owe a big part of my interest in genealogy to royalty. When I was a kid, before we had a computer (remember that?) I used to go through our encyclopedias making family trees of the British royals. (That may be the more serious confession right there.)

Today Queen Elizabeth turns 91 years-old, although her birthday won’t officially be celebrated until June (from what I understand, it’s because the weather is generally better then). But, in honor of this incredible lady’s actual day of birth, I made Chocolate Perfection Pie. A former chef to the Queen recently disclosed that this was her favorite dessert. The pie consists of, get this, a shortbread crust, followed by layers of cinnamon custard, chocolate sauce, cinnamon whipped topping, and chocolate-cinnamon whipped topping. I’m on board. And if it’s good enough for the Queen…

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The Queen’s Chocolate Perfection Pie
Very slightly adapted from this recipe.

Ingredients:
For the crust:
1 3/4 cups all-purpose flour
1/4 cup granulated sugar
Pinch of salt
1 stick unsalted butter, chilled and cubed
1 egg yolk
1/4 – 1/2 cup heavy cream
1/2 tsp vanilla extract

For the filling and toppings:
2 eggs
1/2 tsp ground cinnamon
1/2 cup granulated sugar
1/2 tsp apple cider vinegar
1/4 tsp salt

6 oz. chopped semi-sweet chocolate
1/2 cup water
2 egg yolks

1 cup heavy cream
1/2 tsp ground cinnamon

Dark chocolate or white chocolate bar, optional

Instructions:

For the crust:
Preheat oven to 350 degrees.

Grease a pie or tart pan and set aside.

In a large bowl or food processor, combine the flour, sugar, and salt.

Add in very cold butter cubes. If using a food processor, process for about 5 seconds, until the butter is incorporated and is in small pea-sized pieces. If using a bowl, incorporate the butter into the dry ingredients, pinching between your fingers to achieve pea-sized pieces.

Add egg yolk, 1/4 cup of heavy cream, and vanilla extract. Process or mix by hand until combined. Pinch the dough in your hand. If it holds, it’s ready. If not, add more heavy cream, 1 tablespoon at a time, until the dough holds together. Do not exceed 1/2 cup of heavy cream.

Pour the crumbs into the tart or pie pan, and use your fingers to shape to the bottom and sides.

Line the interior of the crust with parchment paper, fill with dry beans or pie weights. Bake on a cookie sheet for 20-25 minutes. Remove the crust from the oven and remove the pie weights and parchment paper. Poke holes all over the bottom of the pie crust with a fork. Return to the oven and continue baking for about 5 minutes, or until the bottom of the pie crust begins to turn light brown. Remove from oven and allow to cool almost completely.

For the filling and toppings:
Make a double boiler, using a glass or metal mixing bowl over a saucepan of boiling water. Whisking constantly, combine the eggs, sugar, cinnamon, vinegar, and salt in the bowl. The mixture will begin to foam around the edges. Once this occurs, remove from the heat and continue whisking until the mixture becomes creamy and ribbons begin to form. Pour the mixture into the bottom of the crust and bake for 15-20 minutes, until the custard just sets and begins to rise. The surface should be firm to the touch, but not hard. Allow the custard to sink and cool slightly.

In a small saucepan, or in a glass bowl in the microwave, melt the semi-sweet chocolate. Add in 1/2 cup room temperature water and whisk until the water and melted chocolate are combined. Add one egg yolk, whisking in completely before adding the second yolk and whisk completely. Pour half of the mixture (about 1/2 cup) onto the custard in the pie shell. Do not discard the remaining syrup! Bake for about 5-8 minutes. Set on a cooling rack and allow to completely cool.

In a mixing bowl, combine the whipping cream and cinnamon. Beat with a whisk or hand mixer until stiff peaks form. Spread half of the mixture onto the chocolate layer.

Stir together the remaining whipped cream and chocolate syrup until fully combined. Add that layer on top of the cinnamon whipped cream layer.

Shave the dark chocolate or white chocolate bar and sprinkle the shavings over the top of the pie.

Refrigerate for at least one hour before serving.

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The love of cinnamon-flavored, and particularly cinnamon-chocolate-flavored, desserts in the Limanowski household cannot be understated. Examples of that on this blog are here and here. We were more than happy to add another cinnamon-chocolate dish to the rotation and this one, just as its name says, is perfection. It might seem like a lot of steps, but it’s actually quite easy. Give it a try and let me know what you think!

Long live the Queen!

Pennsylvania Dutch Chocolate Funny Cake

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Rarely do I post on weekends, but today I am making an exception. My schedule was all thrown off after I caught a head cold earlier this week that really knocked me out. I tend to go years without getting very sick, but I feel like I’ve had about 2 colds a month since November. My immune system is officially on my list. Anyway, when I can’t taste food, I have absolutely no desire to cook or bake. I mean, really, what’s my motivation?

Toward the end of the week, though, my head was less congested and my taste buds were finally working properly again, which gave me a little time to try the newest recipe on my list: Funny Cake Pie. And it couldn’t be a more fitting recipe April Fool’s Day! This recipe is no joke, though.

Funny cake pie, or just funny cake, is a traditional recipe in the Pennsylvania Dutch community. The recipe consists of vanilla cake batter poured into an unbaked pie shell. Chocolate sauce is poured over the top of the cake batter before baking. As the cake bakes, the chocolate pools underneath the cake, creating a pretty, dark layer between the cake and the pie crust. It’s said that the pie was called “funny” as in “unusual” because of the flip-flop of the chocolate syrup and cake.

Unlike most, this is a recipe that you will often see directly associated with the Pennsylvania Dutch community. I mistakenly thought that the term “Pennsylvania Dutch” specifically applied only to the Amish. Turns out, Pennsylvania Dutch applies to the extremely large groups of people of all religions, who immigrated from what we today know as Germany, who then settled in Pennsylvania in the 17th and 18th centuries. In this case, “Dutch” does not indicate a connection to the Netherlands, but is instead a misnomer for “Deutsch,” the German word for “German.” Pennsylvania Dutch is actually a mix of several different German dialects, as well as American English. After the second World War, the dialect was almost completely discontinued, except by traditionalist religions. For example, if you ever hear Amish or Mennonite groups conversing (which I often do because the train I take to visit my mom goes right through Indiana’s Amish country), you will still hear this dialect spoken.

While I couldn’t find any in-depth history on the origins, the recipe has been made in Pennsylvania Dutch communities for several generations and seems to have had a revival in the 1950s and 60s, with home bakers often substituting the chocolate out for things like caramel, or… orange sauce… That was such a weird period for food. I guess caramel doesn’t sound half bad.

Onto the cake! Er, pie! Cake pie!

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Funny Cake Pie

Pennsylvania Dutch Chocolate Funny Cake
Slightly altered from the recipe on the Maple Springs Farm website.

Funny Cake Pie Ingredients:
For Cake:
2 cups flour
2 tsp baking powder
1/2 tsp salt
1 1/2 cups sugar
1/2 cup vegetable oil
2 eggs
1 cup milk
1 tsp vanilla

For Chocolate Sauce:
1/4 cup, plus 2 tbsp, sugar
1/4 cup unsweetened cocoa powder
1/2 cup water, warm
1/2 tsp vanilla
1 tsp espresso powder, optional

Funny Cake Pie Instructions:

Preheat oven to 350 degrees.

For the pie crust, you either use a 9-inch store-bought pie shell, or, if you would like to make your pie shell from scratch, I like this recipe from Epicurious. (Note: their recipe is enough for two pie shells, and you will only need one.)

In a small bowl, or large measuring cup, combine sugar, cocoa powder, vanilla, and espresso powder (optional). Slowly stir in the warm water until everything is dissolved. If still warm, allow to cool.

In a small bowl, whisk together the flour, baking powder, and salt.

In a large bowl, beat together the sugar and oil with a hand mixer. The mixture will still be quite dry at this point. Add in one egg at a time, beating to completely mix before adding the second egg. Add in the milk and vanilla, and beat until everything is consistently combined.

Slowly add the flour mixture, about 1/2 cup at a time, beating with a hand mixer in between additions, only mixing until the threads of flour disappear. Continue until flour mixture is gone.

Pour the cake batter mixture into the pie crust. Then pour the chocolate sauce over the top of the cake batter.

Bake for approximately an hour, or until a toothpick inserted into the middle of the cake comes out clean.

Allow to cool slightly. Cake can be served warm or at room temperature.

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I really didn’t know what to expect. My first concern was that the cake would cook faster than the pie crust, leaving me with raw dough under the cake. That didn’t happen though. Somehow, both cake and shell cooked perfectly together. The cake was slightly dense in texture, much like a pound cake, and not overly sweet. The chocolate layer was just sweet and moist enough to balance out the carb layers sandwiching it. The best description I can give is something along the lines of chocolate-croissant-muffin? Perfection, really. It’s hard to believe that I’m only just discovering it, and that figuring out how to combine cake and pie was not, in fact, my life’s work up to this point. I’ve seen it mentioned that this cake is sometimes eaten for breakfast. So, I’m not saying you should go make it right now, but… what else are you doing?

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Mexican Hot Chocolate Cake with Whipped Cinnamon Frosting

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Um, today is my birthday. My BIRTHDAY! From what I understand, there are people out there who hate celebrating their birthdays. I’m not one of those people. I can’t get enough birthdays. One a year just seems like… not enough. And, don’t get me wrong, it’s not because I like getting presents (which I actually hate), but because it’s positively the best excuse for a little self-indulgence. For example, I’m going out dancing with a group of friends tonight, if only to prove to myself that my hips still work in my 32nd year. AND, I made myself a cake. If you’ve read this blog at all, you know that my love of cake knows no bounds. I make myself a birthday cake every year. This year, it’s a Mexican hot chocolate cake with a cinnamon whipped cream frosting. I will go ahead and say that it’s now one of my favorite birthday cakes in the last 32 years. It’s not as good as when my mom made them for me. It’s not as good as the one I got when I was five that was shaped like Strawberry Shortcake. No one can top that cake for the rest of time. It’s pretty good, though.

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Mexican Hot Chocolate Cake with Whipped Cinnamon Frosting
Makes 2 8-inch round cakes

Ingredients for Mexican Hot Chocolate Cake:
1 1/3 cups flour
1 1/4 cups sugar
1/3 cup brown sugar
3/4 cup unsweetened cocoa powder
1 tsp salt
1 tsp baking soda
1 tsp baking powder
1 tsp espresso powder
2 tsp cayenne pepper
1 tbsp cinnamon
2 large eggs
1 egg white
1 tsp vanilla
1 cup buttermilk
1/3 cup vegetable oil
1/2 cup boiling water

Ingredients for Whipped Cinnamon Frosting:
Very slightly altered recipe from Food52
2 cups heavy whipping cream
1 tsp vanilla
1 tbsp cinnamon
2 1/2 tsp cornstarch
1/4 cup, plus 1 tbsp, powdered sugar

Instructions for Mexican Hot Chocolate Cake with Whipped Cinnamon Frosting:
Preheat oven to 350 degrees.

Grease 2 8-inch by 2-inch round cake pans and cut out two parchment paper rounds to cover the bottom of the pans.

In a large bowl, whisk together flour, sugar, brown sugar, cocoa powder, espresso powder, salt, baking soda, baking powder, cayenne, and cinnamon.

In a medium bowl, mix well the eggs and egg white, vanilla, buttermilk, vegetable oil. You want to mix until you see that the oil has been thoroughly mixed, but stop just after you no longer see droplets of oil and it is a uniform color of pale yellow.

Add the wet ingredients to the dry ingredients. Mix with a spatula until fully combined.

Quickly stir in the boiling water.

Fill each cake round slightly less than half full.

Bake for 22-25 minutes. Begin checking for doneness around 22 minutes by inserting a toothpick into the center of the cake. When the toothpick comes out clean the cake is done.

Allow the cakes to cool in the pan for about 5 minutes, then remove from pans, peel off the parchment paper, and allow to completely cool on a wire rack before frosting.

While the cakes are cooling, place a deep bowl and metal beaters into the freezer to chill.

In a saucepan, combine the cornstarch and powdered sugar. Fully mix both of these dry ingredients before mixing in 1/2 cup of heavy cream. Stirring constantly, place the saucepan over medium heat until the mixture begins to thicken, but not quite boil.

Remove the pan from heat and allow the mixture to cool in a separate bowl. It’s very important that the mixture is room temperature before you add to the other ingredients.

Remove the bowl and beaters from the freezer. Add the remaining 1 1/2 cups of whipping cream, along with the vanilla, cinnamon, and remaining 1 tbsp of powdered sugar, to the chilled bowl. Beat until the liquid begins to come together, but stop before it’s stiff.

Add in the completely cooled cornstarch mixture a little bit at a time, mixing in as you go. Stop beating when it is just combined.

Frost your completely cooled cake, as desired, immediately.

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Oh, gosh, this cake is dynamite. Warning: it is spicy. If you like a little less spice, use less cayenne. You could also forgo the cayenne altogether, and only use cinnamon. You’ll still have a super moist and quite chocolatey cake. Also, this whipped cream frosting is so killer. I am a whipped cream frosting fanatic, but I hate how weepy it gets after only a short time. The recipe I used here stabilizes it a bit, which makes it not only last longer, but easier to use when frosting your cake.

Also, I want to give a very special shout-out to my friends Kristina and Conrad who gifted me with this bad ass wooden table for my photographs. Conrad made it with his hands from an old piling from the Chicago River. Very cool, right? I have very cool friends.

Malted Milk Chocolate Cupcakes

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It’s winter! Sure, not technically. Technically, winter is still a week away. But here in Chicago, it’s winter. You know how I can tell? Our Christmas tree is up, it’s completely dark around 4:30, and my boots are covered with a chalky white powder up to my ankle from the snow and the salt. Plus, we’ve already had a winter storm warning, along with all the snow we could hope for.

On Saturday night, Alex and I trudged to the grocery just a few blocks away, and grabbed all the fixins for a steak, mashed potato, and broccoli dinner, along with cheap red wine and mulling spices. As the snow fell, we were all tucked away inside, filling ourselves to the gills, basking in the light of our Christmas tree, and watching the last few episodes of Search Party on TBS. Which, HELLO, if you have not watched this show, go watch it right now. I don’t know what to tell you. The premise is quite simple, but the ending literally left us with our mouths hanging open.

Before the snow came, we were busy celebrating my mother-in-law Anne’s birthday. On Friday, we had dinner at the Italian Village, which is one of the oldest Italian restaurants in the city, and a place that Anne misses, since she moved from Chicago to Washington state. She has happy memories of going there before going to a show in the theater district. On Saturday afternoon, we had a little brunch for her at our place, complete with a malted milk chocolate cake.

I wanted to try to make a malted milk chocolate cake for a while and, when I mentioned it to Alex a while back, he said, “You know, my mom loves chocolate malts.” Perfect. I hope she didn’t mind me using her birthday cake as a recipe testing experiment. We all had exactly one slice, then champagne, then we were all ready for a nap. (I actually did sneak away and take a nap.)

I have a couple of new cupcake tins to break in, and I thought, you know what’s better than one big malted milk chocolate cake? Well, it’s 20-odd little malted milk chocolate cakes. Plus, I feel like cupcakes are really “over” right now, but I love them all the same. Are we really not doing cupcakes anymore? Guys, that’s nuts.

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Malted Milk Chocolate Cupcakes
Makes between 20 and 24 cupcakes

Ingredients for Cupcakes:
1 1/3 cups flour
1 1/4 cups sugar
1/3 cup brown sugar
3/4 cup unsweetened cocoa powder
3/4 cup malted milk powder
1 tsp salt
1 tsp baking soda
1 tsp baking powder
1 tsp espresso powder, optional
2 large eggs
1 egg white
1 tsp vanilla
1 cup buttermilk
1/3 cup vegetable oil
1/2 cup boiling water

Ingredients for Frosting:
2 sticks unsalted butter, room temperature
1/4 cup unsweetened cocoa powder
1/2 cup malted milk powder
1 tsp vanilla
1 tsp espresso powder, optional
1 1/2 cups powdered sugar
A pinch of salt
1/4 cup, or slightly less, heavy whipping cream, lukewarm, optional

Instructions for Cupcakes:
Preheat oven to 350 degrees.

Fill two 12-cup muffin tins with cupcake liners.

In a large bowl, whisk together flour, sugar, brown sugar, cocoa powder, espresso powder, malted milk powder, salt, baking soda, and baking powder.

In a medium bowl, mix well the eggs and egg white, vanilla, buttermilk, vegetable oil.

Add the wet ingredients to the dry ingredients. Mix together until fully combined.

Quickly whisk in the boiling water.

Fill each cupcake liner 2/3 of the way full.

Bake until a toothpick inserted into the middle of the cupcakes comes out clean. Begin checking for doneness around the 14 minute mark.

Remove cupcakes to a wire cooling rack.

While the cupcakes are cooling (for at least an hour), beat together the softened butter, cocoa powder, malted milk powder, vanilla, espresso powder, and powdered sugar.

Optional: I don’t like how thick regular buttercream is, so I often add a bit of heavy cream to my frosting to thin it out (that seems like a contradiction). If you decide to do the same, add in the lukewarm heavy cream with all of the other frosting ingredients and beat together.

Frost each cupcake and enjoy!

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They’re malty, they’re chocolatey, and they’re supah, supah moist. I’m very picky about my cupcakes. I don’t like them huge and dense. And, I’ll say, though not proudly, that I really loved the little, super soft cupcakes that my mom used to make from boxes. That’s what these remind me of! Except you made them from scratch, Martha Stewart, and there are no questionable ingredients hiding from you. Go give them a try! Oh, and if you see my mother-in-law, be sure to wish her a happy belated birthday.

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