Grasshopper Pie for Pi Day

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Oh my, I feel like it’s been so long since I’ve written! I jumped off for a while, and time just got away from me. Since I last wrote, I turned 33! I know it’s been almost a month, but I am a nut for my birthday and still very excited about it. As part of my birthday celebration, we met up with friends at the California Clipper, one of our favorite bars. (Completely unrelated: before grabbing drinks, we had dinner at Cellar Door Provisions, and it was just such a delicious meal and wonderful experience that I feel it’s worth mentioning. If you’re in the city, go there!).

The California Clipper has lots of great cocktails, but they also have dessert cocktails, including one of my favorites: the Grasshopper! If you don’t know what a Grasshopper is, basically it’s a combination of creme de menthe (a mint-flavored liqueur), and creme de cacao (a chocolate-flavored liqueur), shaken with cream. It is a delightful guilty pleasure and, though one is my limit, I take any opportunity I can to order one, if they’re available. So, influenced by my boozy birthday dessert cocktail and fueled by the madness that is Pi Day, I present you with a pie that’s been on my list for a while: Grasshopper Pie!

There is no clear evidence where and when Grasshopper Pie was created. What is known is that the Grasshopper cocktail came first, decades before recipes for the pie began circulating in newspapers. It’s commonly accepted that the Grasshopper Cocktail was invented by Philibert Guichet, the second owner of Tujague’s restaurant in New Orleans, while he was at a cocktail competition in New York in 1928 (however some accounts date the cocktail to at least 10 years earlier). The cocktail won second place and Guichet brought the recipe home to New Orleans. In the 1950’s, as alcohol became more readily available in grocery stores, cocktail parties began to increase in popularity and shortly after that, recipes for Grasshopper Pie begin popping up. (In the early 1900’s, there are many newspaper mentions of an actual dish from the Phillipines, which uses real grasshoppers, called Grasshopper Pie.)

The earliest mention in newspapers that I could find related to the grasshopper pie that we know today, was in 1962, describing a filling of marshmallow, creme de menthe, creme de cacao, and cream. The recipe is mentioned repeatedly in newspapers all over the country, but predominately in the Midwest, beginning in the 1960’s, being made with large marshmallows. By the mid-1970’s, I started finding recipes that called for the use of gelatin and egg whites, in place of marshmallows. In The American Century Cookbook: The Most Popular Recipes For The 20th Century, author Jean Anderson suggests that this recipe variation may have come from Knox Unflavored Gelatin and Heublein Cordials, as an attempt to jointly promote their products.

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Grasshopper Pie
From the May 22, 1961 issue of the Chicago Tribune. Makes one 9-inch pie.

Ingredients:
For crust:
15 cream-filled chocolate cookies, crushed
1/4 cup unsalted butter, melted
For filling:
24 large marshmallows
2/3 cup whole milk
2 oz creme de menthe
1 oz white creme de cacao
1 cup heavy cream, whipped (plus another 1/2 cup cream, whipped for topping, optional)

Instructions:

For crust:
Add the melted butter to the bowl of crushed cookies. Mix to fully combine and press into the bottom of a 9-inch pie pan. Refrigerate while you prepare the rest of the ingredients.

For filling:
Put the marshmallows and milk in a double-boiler and melt together. Set aside to cool.

Once cool, stir in the creme de menthe and the creme de cacao, and then the whipped cream.

Pour the mixture into the prepared cookie pie shell. Allow to cool for at least two hours.

Top with more whipped cream and additional crushed cookies, optional.

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For my first try, I made the 1960’s recipe that I found in several newspapers, which used marshmallows. I’m interested in someday making this pie without marshmallows, using the recipe that calls for eggs and gelatin. If I ever follow up on that, I’ll let you know. Side note: This recipe makes a pretty pastel green pie, thanks to the creme de menthe, but you can add some green food coloring, if you really want it to pop and also look as unnatural as possible. I mean, if you’re going to go retro, you might as well really go retro.

It’s also not lost on me that St. Patrick’s Day is in three days. I suppose there won’t be a lot of people celebrating the holiday with pie, but if you do, this should be your go-to. It’s green, it contains (minimal amounts of) booze, and it’s delicious.

And if you really want to go wild on Pi Day, here are a few of my other past favorites from the blog:
Mock Cherry Pie
Penny Nejad’s Banana Meringue Pie
Lemon Atlantic Beach Pie
Bourbon Chocolate Pecan Pie
Hoosier Sugar Cream Pie

Happy Pi Day, everyone!

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Beer Cheddar Soup with Pretzel Croutons

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For our anniversary a few weekends ago, Alex and I spent a long weekend in Door County, Wisconsin. Have you been? It’s absolutely gorgeous. We kept trying to take pictures, and our biggest problem was literally not knowing where to point the camera. Do you take a picture of the tops of the trees that are a stunning electric yellow, orange, red, and purple? Or do you capture the white bark of the trunks of the birches? Even discounting the fall colors, the area is an embarrassment of riches. Let me summarize: We visited a county famous for cherries in one of the most beautiful little corners of a state famous for cheese. Let that sink in. It’s my own version of heaven. I’m shocked that we left willingly. We had big plans to ride horses, go on ghost tours, and drink cherry wine. We didn’t do any of those things. We just kept getting side-tracked by how pretty everything was and stopping on the side of the road to take pictures like true tourists, and then stopping at little farm shops to buy hot sausage links like true sausage lovers. Also, I very nearly reached my goal of eating 7,000 cheese curds over the course of our stay. I came in just shy.

The temperatures here in Chicago are bobbing up and down, refusing to decide between summer and fall. I can’t complain, though. A 75 degree day in the middle of October is fine by me. It’s such a beautiful time of year! But on the chilly days, which I hear will be here soon, you can warm up by making soup! Specifically soup that is full of cheese and beer. In honor of our little trip, I decided to try a recipe for a dish that I saw on a few menus throughout Door County–Beer Cheese Soup!

If you search for Beer Cheese Soup, you’ll find that it’s often labeled a “Midwestern Classic.” Well, I’ve lived in the Midwest almost my whole life and had never heard of this. Not surprisingly, I found, through a bit more research, that in this case “Midwestern” meant mostly the areas of Minnesota and Wisconsin. (In Indiana and Illinois, I’m sure beer cheese soup is around, but we mostly still just *drink* beer.)

Beer and cheese are clearly two things that Wisconsin knows how to do. Beer soup, it turns out, has been around since Medieval times in Europe. (Tell me, will I ever learn how to spell Medieval correctly? I’m a student of history for heaven’s sake!) In Wisconsin, many settlers arriving in the 1800’s were German and Swiss, and they brought the skill of cheese-making with them. Likewise, the German settlers in Wisconsin have been brewing beer since at least the 1830’s.

I actually can’t really drink much beer anymore, because of my oldladyness. I have one and get a headache, and then I get cranky, and I just want a nap. Beer in soup, though, that I can drink. Or, eat…? Soup is such a silly gray area. For this recipe, Wisconsin Sharp Cheddar meets Chicago Blonde Ale for an indulgent, but surprisingly not too heavy, soup. And, I’ve included a recipe for making your own pretzel croutons to sprinkle on top!

Look, this soup is very easy to throw together. And, you certainly don’t have to make your own pretzels. If you don’t mind baking, though, they’re not difficult to make. Like most delicious things, they just take a little time.

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Beer Cheddar Soup with Pretzel Croutons

Beer Cheddar Soup Ingredients:
1/4 cup all-purpose flour
4 tbsp butter
1 stalk of celery, chopped finely
½ medium onion, chopped finely
2 small/medium carrots, chopped finely
1 tsp salt
1 tsp garlic, minced
1 cup whole milk
3 cups low-sodium chicken broth
1/2 tsp Dijon mustard
1/2 tsp Worcestershire sauce
1/2 tsp low-sodium soy sauce
1/2 tsp paprika, optional
3 1/2 cups sharp cheddar
5 oz. blonde ale
1 egg yolk, optional
salt, to taste,
white pepper, to taste

Beer Cheddar Soup Instructions:

Melt 1 tbsp butter in a large pan. Add the chopped onion, carrots, and celery. Sprinkle with tsp salt. Cook on medium heat until translucent, about 8-10 minutes.

Add garlic and continue cooking for about 2 minutes.

Add in 3 more tbsp butter, plus 4 tbsp flour. Mix until the flour seems to fully absorb the butter. Add in milk and continue to stir until the mixture becomes thick. Add in the chicken stock, one cup at a time, stirring in between additions, allowing the mixture to come to a slight boil and thicken again each time. It will not become as thick as it was before you added the broth.

Stir in the Dijon mustard, Worcestershire sauce, soy sauce, and the paprika. Allow to come to a slight boil again.

Turn heat to medium-low and allow to simmer for about 20 minutes. Strain the vegetables out of the mixture, and then return the liquid to the large pan. Add in the beer and allow to come to a slight boil again.

Turn the heat down again. Allow the mixture to stop boiling completely. Then begin adding in the shredded cheddar in small handfuls, stirring in completely after each handful. Do not allow the soup to come to a boil, as this will cause the cheese to clump together.

Once all the cheese has been added, remove the soup from heat and allow to sit for about 1-2 minutes. Whisk one egg yolk into the still-warm soup. (You want the soup to be hot enough to kill salmonella, but not hot enough to immediately scramble the egg. This step is optional, but it does make the soup a bit more full, colorful, and rich. Also, I’m an egg yolk fiend.)

Salt and pepper soup to taste and serve with pretzel croutons loaded up on top!

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Pretzel Crouton Ingredients:
3 1/2 cups bread flour
2 tsp kosher salt
1 tbsp sugar
1 1/4 cups warm water
2 1/4 tsp yeast (1 package)
1 tbsp butter
1 egg, beaten (for egg wash, before baking)
For bath before baking:
1 cup baked baking soda (only 2/3 will be used, but it shrinks a bit as it bakes)
14 cups of water

Pretzel Crouton Instructions:
For bath: Spread baking soda on a baking sheet and bake for 2 hours at 250 degrees. Store in an airtight container. Note: Though it’s not dangerous, be careful when handling as it might irritate sensitive skin.

For bread: Combine yeast, sugar, and salt in a large bowl. Add warm water and allow to sit for five minutes, until the mixture becomes foamy and bubbly.

Add in the flour and mix with a wooden spoon until the mixture becomes a shaggy dough.
Turn out dough onto a very lightly floured surface and knead for 5-7 minutes, until it becomes smoother and begins to form a ball.

Wash out large bowl that you used and coat with 1 tbsp vegetable oil (or less, depending on the size of your bowl).

Put dough back into oiled bowl and cover with plastic wrap. Allow the dough to rise for an hour, or until it doubles in size.

Cover two large baking sheets with parchment paper. Brush on remaining vegetable oil.

When dough is ready, pour it out onto a lightly floured surface. Cut it into 8-10 equal pieces.

Roll each piece into a ball (for pretzel buns) and put onto the oiled baking sheets. Cover each baking sheet with a dishtowel and allow to rise for about 10 more minutes.

In a large pot, add 10 cups of water and 2/3 cup baked baking soda. Bring to a boil, stirring until the baking soda is dissolved. Reduce heat slightly to a simmer.

Fill a large bowl with 4 cups of water, with a few ice cubes and place next to your cooking area.

Using a slotted spatula, carefully drop two to three pretzels into the simmering water-baking soda solution, allowing them to cook for about 45 seconds on each side. Flip them only once.

Remove each pretzel from the hot bath and then dip it into the second water bath, making sure to rinse each side, before returning it to the parchment paper-lined baking sheet.

The pretzels will look slightly puckered and the outside will develop a a bit of a soft shell. (This will bake into that beautiful brown crust of the pretzel).

Bake at 425 degrees for 18-20 minutes. Allow to cool to warm before serving.

Cut 3 or 4 of the roles into 1/2-in. cubes. Melt 1 tbsp butter in a frying pan and saute until browned. Season with salt and toss them onto your soup!

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This soup is so creamy and silky (no big globs of cheese in this soup!) and the flavors of beer and cheese go together so well. I saw that some folks like putting popcorn on top of their beer cheddar soup, which sounds like a super idea to me, especially if it’s handy and you don’t want to make your own pretzels.