Shulamis Rouzaud + Challah

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For your post-Thanksgiving reading pleasure, I’m super excited to welcome my guest, Shulamis Rouzaud, to the blog today!

Shulamis is the founder of the Chicago Bread Club, an organization created to “share the art and knowledge of bread and to promote the regional grain economy.” She started the Chicago Bread Club when she was searching for work, but coming up disappointed. “I was not very satisfied with what was out there. Looking back, what I wanted didn’t exist until I created my own position.” It started with an Instagram message. “I messaged my friend, ‘Hey do you want to start a bread club?’ and she said, ‘Yes!'” It soon became a full-time organization. “Having someone say yes to my idea and support me in the initial planning processes was crucial,” she said. Once the organization took off, it was gratifying for Shulamis to see the impact she had on the community. “Our grain farmers, millers, bakers, and brewers need our support,” she said, “and it’s amazing to be a part of that effort. It’s also exciting to highlight the work of our researchers and extension agents on grain that is grown and can grow in our region.”

Shulamis was born in North Hollywood, California. When she was still quite young, her family moved to Cleveland for her father to attend dental school. She attended very strict Orthodox Jewish private schools through 10th grade, and halfway through 10th grade, she moved to Chicago, where she was accepted into an Orthodox private high school, and she has been in Chicago since. Shulamis told me she had trouble with the strictness of her school in Cleveland. About halfway through 10th grade I got expelled for not following the rules,” she said, explaining that the school was very strict about contact with the opposite sex. “I had friends that were boys,” she told me. “That was my first time in my life that I failed, and I would say that I failed up.”

After school, she struggled with the expectations placed on her as an Orthodox Jewish woman. “I was expected to become a wife and a mother as an adult. Everything I was pushed to be interested in was geared around that. I remember being told that I should probably not go to college but if I did that I needed to be careful to stay on the Orthodox Jewish path.” She attended the one Ultra Orthodox Jewish college in Chicago for two years before dropping out at the age of 22, when she got engaged. Shortly after she was married, she welcomed her daughter, Maya. After giving birth to her daughter, she was a stay-at-home mom, which led to her interest in food as a career. “When Maya was little, I became obsessed with baking and just couldn’t stop.” She began taking classes at Le Cordon Bleu, but within two semesters, she began having reservations. She realized, “The price tag for their culinary arts education did not match the wages and salaries of the restaurant industry and I did not feel I was learning anything I didn’t already know.” She thought she would learn more in professional kitchens, so she began interning, and worked as a pastry cook for over a year. She began asking folks in the pastry world about including whole grains in baking and pastry, having been raised by a mother who had insisted on healthy, Alice Waters-inspired California cuisine accompanied by “100% whole wheat bread that was amazingly dry.” Shulamis as a child wanted meals that were more fun and less healthy, but the spirit of nutritious eating stuck with her. “We never fried anything in the house. Even our latkes were pan-fried instead of fried in deep oil,” she told me. Without receiving much response to her inquiries about whole grains, she began thinking about studying nutrition herself, and she soon graduated from Dominican University with her degree in nutrition and dietetics in 2017. 

The recipe Shulamis chose to share was challah–fitting for her in a number of ways. “I have been making it forever. I’ve been eating challah since I was a baby. My mom hated baking and I started making the challah and desserts for Sabbath meals starting at the age of 11.” The religious significance of the bread was impressed on her through worship and through her Jewish day school. “It was the woman’s job to prepare it and say the blessing that is said when preparing to bake the challah. I learned about the history of challah straight out of the Old Testament in Biblical Hebrew,” she told me. “It is impossible to celebrate the Sabbath without it. There are certain Jewish laws governing what is challah and what is not. The laws differ according to custom, but it centers largely on the enrichment of the dough. Sephardic challah is eggless and unsweetened, often called water challah, and even Ashkenazic challah has laws governing how much sugar can be added. I often see people getting creative with their challah production, usually with largely sweet additions. That is not challah to me.”

The recipe she shared came to her from a member of the Jewish community in Chicago, which has been Shulamis’ favorite since she first ate it as a guest at a Sabbath meal. “Since I got the recipe, I haven’t changed anything, although I’ve been using whole wheat for at least half the flour for years.” Along with the recipe, she shared its meaning. “The symbolism of the cutting board and knife that that the challah rests on is as an altar. It hearkens back to when Abraham was willing to sacrifice his son, Isaac, on the altar. That is why challah is always dipped in salt by the person cutting it at the Sabbath meal (meat is salted after being slaughtered). Sorry if that sounds gross! The Old Testament is not for the faint of heart!” (No apologies necessary!) “Every religious Jewish woman has been making challah since biblical times. Recipes have been passed from woman to woman over time.” Shulamis was passed this recipe, and now passes it to you!

Challah

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Challah
Makes 4 loaves. 

Ingredients: 
150 grams sugar (approximately 3/4 cup) 
1 1/2 tbsp yeast
2 1/2 cups water, warm 
1 egg (plus one more egg for egg wash) 
6 tbsp oil 
3 tsp salt 
2 1/2 lbs bread flour (approximately 9 cups) 

Instructions: 

Whisk together the sugar, yeast, and warm water in a large bowl and allow to sit for 10 minutes. 

Whisk in egg, oil, and salt, then knead in bread flour on a floured surface until dough becomes smooth. 

Allow to rise in a warm area, covered, for 1 1/2 hours. 

After the dough has risen, punch down and divide into four equal pieces. Divide each piece into into 6 strands, roll into a rope that this thicker in the middle and tapered at the sides. Shape into a braid, and set on a parchment paper-covered cookie sheet. Cover and allow to rise for another 1/2 an hour. (If you’ve never braided six strands before, I found this video helpful.) 

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees. 

Once the dough has risen a second time, baste with one whole egg (beaten) and sesame seeds or poppy seeds. 

Bake for 30 minutes, until golden brown. Allow to cool and serve.

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If you are interested in seeing what the Chicago Bread Club is all about, you can check them out at 6:30 tonight (11/28) at Dovetail Brewery! The guest host will be Andy Hazzard of Hazzard Free Farm! Most months, however, the Club meets the last Monday of every month at 6:30 pm. (This month’s was rescheduled thanks to Monday’s nasty weather.) The location changes each month to various local bars and breweries around the city that allow outside food. Most meetings are free (though those that have an admission fee are announced in advance), and no RSVP is required. Locations are announced each month on Instagram. Every month there is a guest host, who is either a farmer, baker, agent, or researcher involved in the regional grain economy. Occasionally there are special workshops and panel events, one of which, their collaborative event with Cheese Sex Death in October, sold out! In March of 2019, you can visit the Chicago Bread Club’s booth at the Good Food Expo.

To learn more about Shulamis’ work with the Chicago Bread Club, you can follow the club on Instagram @chicagobreadclub, or like them on Facebook. You can contact Shulamis directly with any questions or contributions at shulamis@chicagobreadclub.org

Shulamis, thank you so much for sharing your story with me! I look forward to seeing what is in store for you and the Chicago Bread Club in the future! 

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